<come right out of> a comic book

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Han is accusing Williams of leaving his room last night and being out on the island looking for something and attacking his guards, and Williams says it was not him and that there was someone else.
Williams: Mr. Han, suddenly I'd like to leave your island.
Han: It is not possible.
Williams: Bullshit, Mr. Han man! [noticing Han's henchmen approaching him from behind, turning to Han] Man, you come right out of a comic book!
Enter the Dragon, film

What does 'come out of' mean here? I mean, why is it in the present simple and not, say, "have come out of"?

Thank you.
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    He's saying that Han is like a character from a comic book.

    He is not saying he IS from a comic book, so the present perfect is not appropriate.
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    It is just a colloquial phrase.

    When people say or do something that seems very typical of style or genre, we might say e.g.

    You're right out of a Dickens novel. (You're old-fashioned/Victorian.)

    You're right out of the Rocky Horror Show. (You look like an exaggerated, burlesque character.)

    It was right out of a romantic comedy. (The situation was just like in a romantic film.)
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Yes, when the stative verb "to be" is used, it's clear — "to be right out of", but when it is "come"... Is it like in "come from" ("to originate from"), when "come" is used in the simple present too?
     
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