come to my office/come to see me in my office

humvee

Senior Member
Cantonese and Mandarin
come to my office/come to see me in my office <——-Example sentences added to post by moderator (Florentia52)——->

Ok, I admit this is a silly question. These were the most frequent expressions heard in my workplace. Both uttered by non-native speakers. If I were a manager, I would probably say the former or simply come here(when the context is understood).

My question is which one is correct? If it were the latter, I would be surprised because it is too mouthful.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Ok, I admit this is a silly question.
    I have to agree with you...

    "Come to my office", and "Come to see me in my office"

    are different sentence. The first does not say why the person wants the other to go/come to his office,
    The second one gives the purpose of "coming to the office."

    "Being a mouthful" is a relative term; I have no difficulty with either.
     

    humvee

    Senior Member
    Cantonese and Mandarin
    Hi Paul, what would native speakers actually say in workplace? Given that neither of them are native speakers, I would not give them the benefit of doubt.
     

    humvee

    Senior Member
    Cantonese and Mandarin
    Thank you kentix, Putting verbs together without grammatical markers in between is quite like the serial verb construction in Chinese. So I can understand your correction very well.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Your sentences depend on context. Depending on how the first is said, it can be a command:-

    Boss: "... and so next week we will be starting work at 06:00..."
    A: "Stuff that! I'm not getting up that early!"
    Boss: "Come to my office!"

    or an invitation
    Boss: "How are you getting on with the order for London?"
    A: "I am unsure if the customer wants the large size or the small sizes."
    Boss: "Come to my office, I've a translation there."


    A: "Can you tell me how much discount I should give this customer?"
    Boss: Are you in a hurry for the answer?
    A: Hmm... I want it before 4 o'clock.
    Boss: Come to see me in my office in 20 minutes - I'll show you how to work it out.
     

    humvee

    Senior Member
    Cantonese and Mandarin
    So, in the first example, the boss was going to give A a piece of his mind.

    The second example is an invitation. The third one is showing details. Am I right?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The truth is, with no context, we don't know what it means. It's too vague to have a specific meaning by itself.

    Come to my office. I have that book I promised to loan you.

    Come to my office. I've got a nice bottle of whiskey and we could both use a drink.

    It's meaning is unknowable as a standalone phrase.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top