come with, go with without an object

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CarolSueC

Senior Member
USA--English
I never heard "come with" or "go with" without an object for "with" until I moved from the New England to Indiana. It still isn't that common here, but it seems to be used by people originally from the Chicago area. I think it may have originated with German immigrants as a direct translation of "mitkommen" or "mitgehen," which don't require an object. Can anyone verify this and shed any light on how widespread this usage is?
 
  • CarolSueC

    Senior Member
    USA--English
    Here are some examples: "I'm going to the mall. Do you want to go with?"

    "Mary is coming to lunch and Jane is coming with."
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Many decades ago I heard 'come with' from a neighbour child. It was jarring to my
    AE ears. His parents were both from London. I assumed that had something to do with it,
    but I really have no idea if this truncated construction is used in BE.

    "I'm going to play baseball. Do you want to come with?"
     

    kitenok

    Senior Member
    Hi CarolSue,
    I recently moved from Wisconsin, where I had spent about ten years. "Come with" in this sense is very much standard in Wisconsin and Minnesota; it sounded strange to me when I got there, but now I use it myself without a second thought.

    Many regionalisms from this part of the upper Midwest do come from German influence, and your theory about its origin sounds entirely plausible (though I can do nothing to verify it).
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "We're going swimming. Who's coming with," was the call that I heard a dozen times a month while growing up in an Iowa town. I can't say that I've never heard its usage as an adult. In a restaurant where a diner has ordered spaghetti and pizza, just about anywhere in the Midwest, this exchange might be heard: Waitress says, "Do you want the spaghetti served now?" Diner says, "Yeah, that's okay . . . er, No! Bring the spaghetti with."
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Are you coming with? is certainly used in South African English.

    Afrikaans, Dutch and German all have similar separable verbs.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I'll add Yiddish to the list of languages with such constructions. Does anyone here know if Norwegian or Scots has them?

    Here in Arkansas, I had never heard it until my cousin married a man from Chicago whose parents spoke fluent German and Yiddish. The next person I heard use it was from Wisconsin, but he grew up in Chicago.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    In an American movie, I just heard an investigator of an old unsolved murder, when describing the movements of the people involved in the crime, say "Michael goes with.", meaning that Michael got into a car with some other young people. Now, I am wondering whether this is just sloppy English or a common construction in AE, because we British would never say that without adding at least the word "them". It is, however, a word for word translation of the German "Michael geht mit". There is more German influence, reinforced by the simlar Yiddish, on American English than there is on British. Americans, for instance say Gesundheit! when someone sneezes and use the adverb already in places where the British would not, but the Germans would say schon: Come on already/Komm schon.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Can you expand on the context of the example? If this is part of a report, written or oral, a premium might be placed on brevity.
    Certainly, now I have managed to re-orientate myself to some extent:
    The sentence, if sentence it be, is from "Murder in Greenwich" (2003) <<youtube links are not permitted>> An author who intends to write a book on the crime is being briefed by his assistant on the sequence of events on the night of the murder. If you do decide he is speaking in note form, we Brits would still never say it that way.

    The sentence is missing a noun after a preposition rather than an object as it says in the new title, but if it is an imitation of a German construction, then the with is the particle of a phrasal verb.
     
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    Wilma_Sweden

    Senior Member
    Swedish (Scania)
    I'm afraid I use it all the time. I'm from a very Scandinavian-heavy/German-heavy area of the United States (Minnesota), and it's very commonplace. It's so commonplace that I would find it more unusual to hear the object tacked on at the end. (As in, "Do you want to come with us?").
    This construction, as I understand it, is indeed labelled Scandinavianism by the linguists and listed as one of a few influences on the English of e.g. Minnesota and Wisconsin.

    Jumping across to Britain, I find it similarly logical that it's used in Northern dialects, particularly in those areas where Vikings once ruled.

    /Wilma
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I wonder if with can mean along with any verb whatever, or whether it is just with come and go. For example, I think I have heard my friend from Wisconsin say:

    You need to bring an umbrella with.
     

    rcottere

    Member
    English - American (East Coast)
    From a sociolinguistic standpoint, I personally associate the expression "to come with" with the valley girl accent of California. I really can't offer any other explanation as to the reason.
     

    Wilma_Sweden

    Senior Member
    Swedish (Scania)
    I wonder if with can mean along with any verb whatever, or whether it is just with come and go. For example, I think I have heard my friend from Wisconsin say:

    You need to bring an umbrella with.
    In Swedish we also use med (with) in the context of taking or carrying objects along, so this construction is hardly surprising. Apart from ordinary movement verbs like come and go, we can use it for practically any movement verb when the meaning is to accompany someone.

    /Wilma
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Moderator note:

    Although we do allow the occasional passing mention of a word or construction in another language when it is indispensable for explaining something, English Only is a monolingual forum. Please avoid examples in other languages and do not discuss the grammar of other languages.

    Thank you.

    Nunty
     
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