comes at bus stop/ goes from ( shorter version , with only the quetion mentioned in the title.

Hello, please answer my question:
The school bus comes /arrivesat 6 o’clock.
The bus departs/goes from /leaves the stop at 6:10am.
Here the stop remains the same, that is sunder nagar.
Can these sentences be used?
Thank you......
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    The school bus arrives at 6 o'clock.
    The school bus arrives at 6am.
    The school bus leaves (the stop) at 6:10am.
    The school bus departs at 6:10am.


    Yes, you can say those. Sunder Nagar is a city, and is therefore capitalized.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    All except "The bus departs the stop at 6:10am." are idiomatic and current. To depart is now rarely used with an object, so only "The bus departs at 6:10am." or "The bus departs from the stop at 6:10am" would be idiomatic

    Crossposted
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I see your title has "comes at bus stop". That doesn't work, I'm afraid.

    The school bus arrives at 6 o’clock.:tick:
    The school bus arrives at the bus stop at 6 o’clock.:tick:
    The school bus comes at 6 o’clock.:tick:
    The school bus comes to the bus stop at 6 o’clock.:tick:
    The school bus comes at the bus stop at 6 o’clock.:cross:
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I might, though I'm much more likely to say neither "comes to" nor "arrives at" but "gets to". :)
     
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