comfortable and convenient, what is the difference?

Polish
#1
<< --- comfortable and convenient, what is the difference? --- >>

According to the dictionary meaning is the same, if someone could explain to me whether these words can be used interchangeably or maybe they have some other meaning?:)
 
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  • Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    #2
    Hello and welcome to the forum!

    I wonder which dictionary you are using?

    comfortable /ˈkʌmftəbəl; ˈkʌmfətəbəl/ adj
    • giving comfort or physical relief
    • at ease
    • free from affliction or pain
    • (of a person or situation) relaxing
    • informal having adequate income
    • informal (of income) adequate to provide comfort
    http://www.wordreference.com/definition/comfortable

    convenient /kənˈviːnɪənt/ adj
    suitable for one's purpose or needs; opportune
    easy to use
    close by or easily accessible; handy
    http://www.wordreference.com/definition/convenient
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    #3
    From our dictionary:

    comfortable

    • giving comfort or physical relief
    • at ease
    • free from affliction or pain
    • (of a person or situation) relaxing
    • informal having adequate income
    • informal (of income) adequate to provide comfort
    convenient

    • suitable for one's purpose or needs; opportune
    • easy to use
    • close by or easily accessible; handy
    They are not at all the same ... and I'm afraid I can't say more than that because we answer questions about words and phrases when they're in sentences with context. Speaking of which, when you put a word or phrase in our Search box and click search, you'll find three helpful things:
    1. An "in context" link that will show you the word or phrase in contemporary context.
    2. Dictionary definitions.
    3. Links to previous threads, if there are any.

    Welcome to the forum. :)

    Added: Cross-posted with Biffo, but I'll leave it because of the last bit of advice.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    #6
    You're welcome.
    When you quote an authority, such as a dictionary, please let us know the name of the publication and the publisher*. It helps us to check its authenticity.

    ________________________________________________________
    *or if it isn't in English, I think you should just state that fact.
    Incidentally it is a rule of the forum to state your source. :)
     
    #8
    convenient /kənˈviːnɪənt/ adj
    suitable for one's purpose or needs;
    Hello everyone,

    now I'm a bit puzzled. The other day I came across the sentence "My kitchen is very convenient" and was sure it should be "comfortable" but having read this definition of "convenient" I understand I was wrong. Come to think of it, the italicized sentence can be paraphrased to "My kitchen has all the modern conveniences". Am I right"?

    Thank you.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    #9
    now I'm a bit puzzled. The other day I came across the sentence "My kitchen is very convenient" and was sure it should be "comfortable" but having read this definition of "convenient" I understand I was wrong. Come to think of it, the italicized sentence can be paraphrased to "My kitchen has all the modern conveniences". Am I right"?
    No, to me there's a difference.

    "My kitchen is very convenient" suggests to me that your kitchen is easy to use with everything neatly arranged so as to be accessible.


    "My kitchen has all the modern conveniences" I would take to mean that your kitchen is equipped with modern labour-saving appliances and gadgets. :)
     
    #10
    Thanks a lot for the prompt reply, DonnyB. In that case, what does "My kitchen is very comfortable" imply? Does it make any sense at all, given that "convenient" pretty much covers the description of a good kitchen?

    Thank you.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    #14
    Thanks a lot for the prompt reply, DonnyB. In that case, what does "My kitchen is very comfortable" imply? Does it make any sense at all, given that "convenient" pretty much covers the description of a good kitchen?
    I think I'd probably interpret that to mean having decent chairs or seating of some sort installed so that you didn't have to stand up and work all the time.

    [cross-posted]
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    #16
    what does "My kitchen is very comfortable" imply? Does it make any sense at all, given that "convenient" pretty much covers the description of a good kitchen?

    My kitchen is very comfortable.

    That sounds quite unusual in English. "Cosy" might work if you mean that your kitchen is a small but pleasant space in which to work (and perhaps also eat).

    If it's the dining area that's comfortable, it isn't really the kitchen as such. I can imagine a combined kitchen/dining space where you can sit comfortably and have a nice meal.
     
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