comic alphabets

AntiScam

Senior Member
Arabic
Hi,
Meaning of comic alphabets?


Crystal makes a simple argument-that since playing with language is so natural, a natural way to learn language is to play with it-while he discusses puns, crosswords, lipograms, comic alphabets, rhymes, funny voices taken from dialect and popular culture, limericks, anagrams, scat singing, and much more.

Source:Language Play
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    One meaning of an "alphabet" is a children's book of the letters of the alphabet with appropriate words demonstrating the letters:

    A as in Apple
    B as in Boy
    C as in Candy
    D as in dog... etc.

    A comic alphabet is thus

    A as in aisle (pron. eye-l)
    B as in bdellium - silent first letter
    C as in cnidaria - silent first letter and very rare word
    D as in djin - sounds like gin
    E as in eye
    F as in faze homophone of the commoner "phase"
    G as in gnat - silent first letter
    H as in heir - silent first letter
    I as in isle - homophone of aisle, see A
    etc.

    Obviously, in a comic alphabet, the comments would not be included.
     
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    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    This doesn't tell us whether the humor is in the picture, as here:
    .

    Or in the narrative, as here:
    (A traditional format for an alphabet is "A is for ....", "B is for ..." and so on. Often they rhyme, to make them easier to remember.

    You can see the whole alphabet here: The Gashly Crumb Tinies by Edward Gorey
     
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    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    Incredibly ( to me) there is a book about comic alphabets:
    Comic Alphabets: Their Origin, Development, Nature
    By Eric Partridge
    I read through a page, but it seems there are multiple types of comic alphabets and I didn't have sufficient interest to read and summarize. However, it will appear if you google the words.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    This doesn't tell us whether the humor is in the picture, as here:
    .

    Or in the narrative, as here:
    (A traditional format for an alphabet is "A is for ....", "B is for ..." and so on. Often they rhyme, to make them easier to remember.

    You and see the whole alphabet here: The Gashly Crumb Tinies by Edward Gorey


    Anti-scam, you will love this one - you're featured in it:D


    Thanks but sorry I am afraid this is not enough to tell this is comic alphabets
    I think you get the picture now:)
     
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    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    There is another type of comic alphabet where the letter+example itself makes a word or phrase. For example:
    A for 'orses (hay for horses)
    B for brook (Beaverbrook)
    C for Thailanders (Seaforth Highlanders)
    D for Kate (defecate)
    E for brick (heave a brick)
    F for vest (effervesced)... and so forth ad infinitum.​

    The point is that "comic" has at least two meanings -- illustrated by drawings and humorous.
     

    AntiScam

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    There is another type of comic alphabet where the letter+example itself makes a word or phrase. For example:
    A for 'orses (hay for horses)
    B for brook (Beaverbrook)
    C for Thailanders (Seaforth Highlanders)
    D for Kate (defecate)
    E for brick (heave a brick)
    F for vest (effervesced)... and so forth ad infinitum.​

    The point is that "comic" has at least two meanings -- illustrated by drawings and humorous.
    This is very interesting Keith. I like it very much.
    Edit:
    How would you describe the smart manipulation of the words? Smart, ingenious, etc?

    When I first read 'comic alphabet' only humor crossed my mind.
     
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    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    When I read 'comic alphabet' I immediately thought the same as Keith. It was originally, or at least famously, done as the Surrealist Alphabet on an old 78, and when they got to V for la France they burst briefly into singing the Marseillaise, so I always do too when I recite it.
     
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