Comma after ellipsis

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the1dsuniverse

Senior Member
Spanish
Do you guys think there should be a comma after an ellipsis or is that not necessary?

I eat dessert after dinner every other night: ice cream, cookies… whatever we have that week.

I eat dessert after dinner every other night: ice cream, cookies…, whatever we have that week.
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    That's not necessary. In fact (except for quotation marks and parentheses), you shouldn't put one punctuation mark immediately after another. E.g: either a colon or a full stop (like I just did) - not both.
     

    Warped

    Senior Member
    Finnish, Swedish
    That's for British English. In AmE, you put a comma after "e.g." I haven't seen a writer use a colon after "e.g.," though a comma should be used.
     

    the1dsuniverse

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    That's not necessary. In fact (except for quotation marks and parentheses), you shouldn't put one punctuation mark immediately after another. E.g: either a colon or a full stop (like I just did) - not both.
    But when you say for instance "etc.", a lot of times you need to use "etc.," because the sentence continues right after the enumeration you've just made.
     

    the1dsuniverse

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I didn't mean like you use "etc." multiple times in a sentence. I meant to say that a lot of times when we use "etc.", it doesn't come at last, for example: Pigment is mixed into oil, glue, egg, etc., to make different types of paint.

    In Spanish in that case, we'd use a comma. I just don't know if it's the same in English
     

    the1dsuniverse

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I didn't mean like you use "etc." multiple times in a sentence. I meant to say that a lot of times when we use "etc.", it doesn't come at last, for example: Pigment is mixed into oil, glue, egg, etc., to make different types of paint.

    In Spanish in that case, we'd use a comma. I just don't know if it's the same in English
    Does anyone think a comma is needed after "etc." here in this example?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    And just keep writing after the period?
    Yes.
    Pigment is mixed into oil, glue, egg, and other things to make different types of paint.
    We wouldn't put a comma after "things" so there's no reason to put a comma after "etc." The period is part of the abbreviation. If your style guide doesn't require a period with an abbreviation, there wouldn't be a period there.
    Pigment is mixed into oil, glue, egg, etc to make different types of paint.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - US
    There is no period after an abbreviation. Some abbreviations include a period within them.

    e.g. = for example
    etc. = and so forth
     

    the1dsuniverse

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    There is no period after an abbreviation. Some abbreviations include a period within them.

    e.g. = for example
    etc. = and so forth
    Yes, but for instance, "e.g." is normally followed by a comma, right? Like you would say: I bought a whole bunch of things e.g., water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.
     

    Warped

    Senior Member
    Finnish, Swedish
    It's "... a bunch of things, e.g., water bottles, ..." because you would as well use a comma before and after "for example": "... things, for example, ..."

    When it comes to placing a comma after "e.g.," it's already stated in this thread that it depends on whether you want to speak and write British English or American English.
     

    the1dsuniverse

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    It's "... a bunch of things, e.g., water bottles, ..." because you would as well use a comma before and after "for example": "... things, for example, ..."

    When it comes to placing a comma after "e.g.," it's already stated in this thread that it depends on whether you want to speak and write British English or American English.
    So does "etc." follow that same rule? If you write a comma after "etc." it'd be AE, and no comma BE? Or does it not matter?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I checked several websites, using a google search on [ "e.g." punctuation ]

    The dropdown from google (which matches other websites) says: "Both abbreviations i.e. and e.g. are preceded by a mark of punctuation, usually a comma. In American English, both are generally followed by a comma, though not in British English, and are not italicized."

    The Chicago manual of style online says the punctuation before these abbreviations "can be a comma unless the material after the abbreviation starts a new independent clause. Then a colon, an em dash, or parentheses might work."

    In the example in #16: "e.g." ("for example") is not part of the clause before it, so it needs a colon before it. As Warped explains, it would have a comma after it in AE, but not in BE:

    I bought a whole bunch of things for example, water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.:cross:
    I bought a whole bunch of things, for example, water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.:cross:
    I bought a whole bunch of things: for example, water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.:tick:
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I found this commend on punctuating "etc." at grammarist.com:

    Treat etc. as you would the phrase and the rest. When it’s in the middle of the sentence, it doesn’t need to be followed by a comma.
     

    Warped

    Senior Member
    Finnish, Swedish
    So does "etc." follow that same rule? If you write a comma after "etc." it'd be AE, and no comma BE? Or does it not matter?
    If it is part of a sentence, it can be followed by a comma. It could be just a matter of style. Here's a quote regarding it:
    In American English, etc. ends in a period, even midsentence. It is traditionally enclosed in commas when it doesn’t end a sentence, but nowadays the comma that follows etc. is disappearing. The 1979 edition of Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style insists that etc. be followed by a comma: Letters, packages, etc., should go here. But Bryan A. Garner’s 1998 edition of A Dictionary of Modern American Usage advises against a following comma, saying it is “more logical” to omit it: Carrots, potatoes, broccoli, etc. have the advantage of being vegetables. Garner’s point is that if we replaced etc. with something like and celery we would not follow celery with a comma.
    All About etc. - Grammar & Punctuation | The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation
    ____
    I checked several websites, using a google search on [ "e.g." punctuation ]

    The dropdown from google (which matches other websites) says: "Both abbreviations i.e. and e.g. are preceded by a mark of punctuation, usually a comma. In American English, both are generally followed by a comma, though not in British English, and are not italicized."

    The Chicago manual of style online says the punctuation before these abbreviations "can be a comma unless the material after the abbreviation starts a new independent clause. Then a colon, an em dash, or parentheses might work."

    In the example in #16: "e.g." ("for example") is not part of the clause before it, so it needs a colon before it. As Warped explains, it would have a comma after it in AE, but not in BE:

    I bought a whole bunch of things for example, water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.:cross:
    I bought a whole bunch of things, for example, water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.:cross:
    I bought a whole bunch of things: for example, water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.:tick:
    However, there are more style books which advise that a writer use a comma when introducing a list of items and a semicolon when introducing a complete sentence:
    Rule 2 – Use a comma before and after introductory words such as namely, that is, i.e., for example, e.g., or for instance when they are followed by a series of items.
    Example:
    You may be required to bring many items, e.g., sleeping bags, pans, and warm clothing.
    Commas, Part 10 - Grammar & Punctuation | The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation
    Rule 2. Use a semicolon before such words and terms as namely, however, therefore, that is, i.e., for example, e.g., for instance, etc., when they introduce a complete sentence. It is also preferable to use a comma after these words and terms.

    Example: Bring any two items; however, sleeping bags and tents are in short supply.
    Semicolons | Punctuation Rules

    On the other hand, I found this on the same page to which I gave a link in this thread. "Etc." at the end of a series beginning with "e.g." may be redundant, which may turn a part of this thread upside down. However, it's only one of many style books (I guess there are many), but it's pretty logical:
    Do not use etc. with a “list” that gives only one example; there should be at least two items listed. And never use etc. at the end of a series that begins with for example, e.g., including, such as, and the like, because these terms make etc. redundant: they already imply that the writer could offer other examples.
    All About etc. - Grammar & Punctuation | The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation
     
    Last edited:

    the1dsuniverse

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I checked several websites, using a google search on [ "e.g." punctuation ]

    The dropdown from google (which matches other websites) says: "Both abbreviations i.e. and e.g. are preceded by a mark of punctuation, usually a comma. In American English, both are generally followed by a comma, though not in British English, and are not italicized."

    The Chicago manual of style online says the punctuation before these abbreviations "can be a comma unless the material after the abbreviation starts a new independent clause. Then a colon, an em dash, or parentheses might work."

    In the example in #16: "e.g." ("for example") is not part of the clause before it, so it needs a colon before it. As Warped explains, it would have a comma after it in AE, but not in BE:

    I bought a whole bunch of things for example, water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.:cross:
    I bought a whole bunch of things, for example, water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.:cross:
    I bought a whole bunch of things: for example, water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.:tick:
    Why is the second wrong, though? Isn't it okay to use a comma before "for example"?
    I found this commend on punctuating "etc." at grammarist.com:

    Treat etc. as you would the phrase and the rest. When it’s in the middle of the sentence, it doesn’t need to be followed by a comma.
    Okay thanks! :)
    If it is part of a sentence, it can be followed by a comma. It could be just a matter of style. Here's a quote regarding it.
    All About etc. - Grammar & Punctuation | The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation
    ____
    However, there are more style books which advise that a writer use a comma when introducing a list of items and a semicolon when introducing a complete sentence:
    Commas, Part 10 - Grammar & Punctuation | The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation
    Semicolons | Punctuation Rules

    On the other hand, I found this on the same page to which I gave a link in this thread. "Etc." at the end of a series beginning with "e.g." may be redundant, which may turn a part of this thread upside down. However, it's only one of many style books (I guess there are many), but it's pretty logical:
    All About etc. - Grammar & Punctuation | The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation
    Thank you so much for all your research!! :)
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I bought a whole bunch of things for example, water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.:cross:
    I bought a whole bunch of things, for example, water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.:cross:
    I bought a whole bunch of things: for example, water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.:tick:

    Why is the second wrong, though? Isn't it okay to use a comma before "for example"?
    The rule in #19 says you put punctuation before "for example", but the rule also says it can't always be a comma. It depends on the sentence.

    Look at this example:

    "I am a good planner. I bought a whole bunch of things, for example."

    In this sentence "for example" modifies the "bought" sentence. If you use a comma betweeen "things" and "for example", that is what the sentence means.

    But then "for example" is not part of your list (it can't do both things) so you have to change the punctuation to this:

    I bought a whole bunch of things, for example: water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.:tick:
     

    the1dsuniverse

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    The rule in #19 says you put punctuation before "for example", but the rule also says it can't always be a comma. It depends on the sentence.

    Look at this example:

    "I am a good planner. I bought a whole bunch of things, for example."

    In this sentence "for example" modifies the "bought" sentence. If you use a comma betweeen "things" and "for example", that is what the sentence means.

    But then "for example" is not part of your list (it can't do both things) so you have to change the punctuation to this:

    I bought a whole bunch of things, for example: water bottles, apples, oranges, bananas, etc.:tick:
    If it were "e.g." instead of "for example", would there be a comma after it, or a colon as well?
     
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