comma before 'and then' [conjunction]: loan is $100, and then there

avbm

Member
Dutch - Holland
"And then" can mean "in addition" or "next".

Is it true that when it means "in addition" you must always put a comma in front of it? For example:

"The loan is $100, and then there is the interest to pay."
 
  • Starfrown

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think you're pretty much right, but in many cases, a dash is appropriate.

    "The loan [itself] is $100--and then there is the interest to pay."

    There is very often a strong pause before a phrase introduced with "and then."
     
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