comma before 'as well as' / 'so' [conjunction]: are happy, so are

Bigtime

Senior Member
Arabic
I wrote:


1. I collected the books as well as the note-books.
2. The boys are happy, so are the girls.


Why did we place a comma before "so are" and didn't place it before " as well as"?

Thanks.
 
  • I wrote:


    1. I collected the books as well as the note-books.
    2. The boys are happy, so are the girls.


    Why did we place a comma before "so are" and didn't place it before " as well as"?

    Thanks.
    I would use the conjunction 'and' in the second sentence:
    The boys are happy, and so are the girls.

    In any case, "so are the girls" is a clause with a new subject and a verb. We usually put a coma before a conjunction that introduces a complete clause.

    "As well as" does not introduce a clause.


    In the second sentence, the "so" introduces a complete clause with a subject and a verb -- "so are the girls happy".
     
    It seems to me that, in the first sentence, "as well as" could be replaced by "and". "as well as" is used for emphasis.
    In the second sentence, the comma could also be replaced by "and". "So are the girls" is almost an afterthought. 'Oh yes, I'd better mention the girls too'.
    Views differ but I would very rarely put a comma before "and" and would therefore write "The boys are happy and so are the girls".
     
    To be honest, in the second one, strictly speaking, if you don't put an 'and' in, you should put a semi-colon.

    The boys are happy; so are the girls.

    This is a perfect example of two independent clauses that share a similar thought. In America, and much of Britain, such high-faluting grammar use will probably get you tarred and feathered, which is probably why the posters above have suggested adding the 'and'.
     
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