comma before 'if' / after 'please' [conjunction; adverb]

kritika

Senior Member
India - Hindi & English
Hey,

I want to check if we need a ',' befor if in the following sentence.

Please confirm if John would be able to monitoring calls for Qu today.


Please correct if there's any other error.

Thanks!!
 
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  • ywf

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I don't think we need a comma before if.

    The whole if sub-clause serves as an object like it, them, him...

    We say "Please confirm it", not "Please confirm, it".

    Similarly, we say "Please confirm if ...", not "Please confirm, if ...".
     
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    Metztli

    Senior Member
    Mexico Spanish / English
    ywf is right, you don't need a comma before if, but you do need a comma after Please.

    Please, confirm if John would be able to monitor calls for Quantum today.
     

    Metztli

    Senior Member
    Mexico Spanish / English
    You need no commas.

    'Please confirm if John would be able to monitor calls for Quantum today.'
    Rover

    Really? I mean, it's not that I don't believe you or Panjandrum... it is just that I've always seen (and written) please followed by a comma.

    Would you say no commas for this particular sentence or in general?

    Thanks for your help.
     

    xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    it is just that I've always seen (and written) please followed by a comma.

    Where have you seen it? I'm trying to think of when I would follow "please" with a comma.

    From dictionary.com:
    –adverb 1. (used as a polite addition to requests, commands, etc.) if you would be so obliging; kindly: Please come help.
     

    Billf

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Where have you seen it? I'm trying to think of when I would follow "please" with a comma.

    From dictionary.com:
    –adverb 1. (used as a polite addition to requests, commands, etc.) if you would be so obliging; kindly: Please come help.


    It all depends ;) There are instances where a comma would be put after please, particularly if you are emphasising the use of it in a request (or writing the sentence that I've just written...). For example:

    Please, if you must play music late at night, keep the volume down.

    Please, when walking in the gardens, keep to the path and do not stray onto the grass.

    But in the original sentence queried, "Please confirm if John would be able to monitoring calls for Quantum today" - no comma is needed, although the word "monitoring" should be changed to "monitor".
     
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    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    It all depends ;) There are instances where a comma would be put after please, particularly if you are emphasising the use of it in a request (or writing the sentence that I've just written...). For example:

    Please, if you must play music late at night, keep the volume down.

    Please, when walking in the gardens, keep to the path and do not stray onto the grass.

    But in the original sentence queried, "Please confirm if John would be able to monitoring calls for Quantum today" - no comma is needed, although the word "monitoring" should be changed to "monitor".
    In fact in


    Please, if you must play music late at night, keep the volume down.

    we have "please keep the volume down" as the uncomma'd basic phrase (I think I just invented a word there), with "if you must play music late at night" inserted as a parenthesis and so that is indicated with the commas.
     

    kritika

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi & English
    I have few more questions related to punctuations.

    1. Can we use 2 ',' in one sentence
    2. In the following sentece do we need a ',' before by:

    It was done on Monday, by Tim.

    Thanks!
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Yes and yes. A comma tends to represent a slight pause in speech. As such there is no need to add one before "by Tim", but if you do it suggests that this is an afterthought.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I have few more questions related to punctuations.
    ...
    One of the links in the sticky thread at the top of the forum is good on commas.
    http://www.informatics.sussex.ac.uk/department/docs/punctuation/node00.html

    There are others :)
    US English, Capital Community College Foundation:
    http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/marks/marks.htm

    US English, the Owl at Purdue University:
    http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/566/01/

    US Government Printing Office:
    Start at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/stylemanual/ and search for punctuation.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm interested that both timpeac and Rover answered "yes" to the second question in post 14; I'd have answered "no"...:cool:

    I think, though, that we're all agreed in practice:
    It was done on Monday by Tim.:tick:
    It was done on Monday, by Tim. :tick: (if you want to make "by Tim" sound like an afterthought, or perhaps if you want to emphasise it.)
     
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