comma before or after adverb? go for a walk, especially when

lhworld

Member
Korean
Hi there,
Where should I put comma in this sentence?
Or do I even need a comma here?
If the sentence needs a comma, how do I know where to use in this particular sentence?

1) I go for a walk more especially, when the weather is nice.

2) I go for a walk more, especially when the weather is nice.

3) I go for a walk more especially when the weather is nice.
 
  • Ceremoniar

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English
    As the sentence stands by itself, you would not need the word more, and would simply write I go for a walk, especially when the weather is nice. If, however, you had been writing about how you prefer to walk, rather than bicycle or something else, but still did both, then number two would be correct.
     

    lhworld

    Member
    Korean
    how about, "I go for a walk more often, especially when the weather is nice." ??

    or, "I go for a walk often, especially when the weather is nice."
     

    Languagethinkerlover

    Senior Member
    English-British and U.S.
    Especially already addresses the fact that you walk often (or more likely to walk) when the weather is nice.

    You could also write, "I go walking especially when the weather is nice."
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    The "more" is appropriate but only under specific circumstances, and it would usually require adding another word to the sentence.

    "For a long time, I could not walk much because of my knee injury. Now I walk more, especially when the weather is nice." Here, "more" does not cover "especially."

    "More" should not be used as an adverb to modify "especially"; there, it would be redundant.

    If you do use "more," then you need to follow it with a comma. Neither sentence #1 nor sentence #3 is proper English.
     
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