comma or semicolon before 'i.e.' [abbreviation]: two elements; i.e.

as_99

Senior Member
Arabic
For this sentence after word "elements", should I use semicolon ";" or comma with "i.e."

Example:

The profitability is directly influenced by two elements, i.e. (or ;) the developing cost and efficiency of the entire plan to meet the segments’ needs.

Segment means a part of the market of market share

Please advise
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    A comma is typically used after i.e. I've never seen a semicolon.
    Just to clarify, there would be a comma both before and after the i.e.
    ... two elements, i.e., the developing cost and efficiency


    In this situation, however, I would prefer the word "namely", or even the more archaic "viz."
     
    Last edited:

    Kumpel

    Senior Member
    British English
    The profitability is directly influenced by two elements, i.e. (or ; ) the developing cost and efficiency of the entire plan to meet the segments’ needs.

    I, personally, would use a comma, and only before the i.e.; I do agree, however, namely feels more appropriate.

    Lloyd
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    AE uses i.e., or i.e., Also e.g.,
    BE uses i.e. and e.g.

    Following Occam's law (if it applies to language, that is), no comma should be written.
    Thanks - I wasn't aware of the AE/BE split here.
    I have seen Occam's razor (as in KISS, although technically it applies to theories or explanations, I think) used to justify the use of ie and eg in some style sheets that eschew full stops. :eek: I don't recall their stances on commas around ie and eg, though.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Many/some style guides advise against ie or eg in formal reports.
    This reads like a formal report.

    If you decide to use them, consider what punctuation you would use with the full version, and use the same with the abbreviation.
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    Two American style manuals which require a comma after i.e. are the U.S. Government Printing Office Style Manual, Section 8.147 (text, PDF) and the University of Minnesota Style Manual. The U of M's manual calls for it explicitly, while the USGPO manual states the following:

    8.147. [The comma is used to] set off explanatory abbreviations or words which summarize or explain preceding matter.

    The industry is related to groups that produce finished goods; i.e., electrical machinery and transportation equipment.

    I take it that e.g. would count as an explanatory abbreviation explaining preceding matter.
     
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