comma with adjective [typo?]: sung to elaborate, unfamiliar settings

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cameo

Member
Chinese, Taiwan
“Obviously the Archdeacon was out to impress his visitors, for the Te Deum and the Benedictus were sung to elaborate, unfamiliar settings, which the congregation could not attempt and which seems rather beyond the choir at some points.”

I think maybe the comma before 'unfamiliar' is a misprint? Thanks again.
 
  • CAMullen

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Not really. A comma is usually put between adjectives as a substitute for the word, "and."

    If, on the other hand, the topic were "unfamiliar settings," and you were talking about elaborate ones as opposed to simple ones, then the comma would not have fit.
     

    cameo

    Member
    Chinese, Taiwan
    I was so sure the 'elaborate' was a verb and thus got confused. Thanks a lot CAMullen and cirrus.
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    cameo said:
    I was so sure the 'elaborate' was a verb and thus got confused. Thanks a lot CAMullen and cirrus.
    It is both a verb and an adjective. A reporter might ask someone to elaborate on an argument if they are describing a policy.
     
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