Commandant de Police Fonctionnel

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Malcius

Senior Member
English - England
Hello everyone

Does this phrase simply translate as Police Commander or does the "Fonctionnel" have more of a function?

Unfortunately, I can provide no further context. I have seen a suggested German translation of the term as "Polizeihauptmeister" if that helps (assuming it to be correct of course).

Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • hibouette

    Senior Member
    France and French
    I think the french expression is :
    commandant fonctionnel de police

    It's a function in the police.
    fonctionnel maybe means "in function/operating"
    so as to mark the difference between "commandant that haven't work as commandant..." ?
     

    Malcius

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thanks Hibouette

    I've had "Police Operations Commander" suggested to me elsewhere, which although it doesn't seem to be in British English usage does seem to match the definition found in Google hits for your suggested rewording.

    Thanks again.
     

    catheng06

    Senior Member
    Français
    A long time after

    Here fonctionnel has nothing to do with in function or operating

    It is just a "higher rank" for the salary they get......;

    In case it helps someone some day .......
     

    Malcius

    Senior Member
    English - England
    A long time after

    Here fonctionnel has nothing to do with in function or operating

    It is just a "higher rank" for the salary they get......;

    In case it helps someone some day .......
    So, maybe something like Senior Police Commander would have been best.
     

    Malcius

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Guess so .....

    if senior means better paid for the same job because of seniority.

    (could you please confirm ? )
    'Senior' doesn't necessarily refer to pay but as part of a job title, it would mean they are higher ranked than someone with the same title but without any qualifier. A senior commander would outrank a commander. Logically, I would think they should be better paid but I don't know enough about the police pay structure to know whether that would necessarily be the case.
    Senior commander is not an actual rank in the British police but I think it would get the meaning across.
    Not sure if 'Commander' directly corresponds to the French 'Commandant'. If it does, the rank immediately above commander appears to vary according to which branch of the force they work for (Assistant Commissioner or Deputy Assistant Commissioner). Not all branches have the rank 'Commander'.
    I would imagine that, as civil servants, police are subject to civil service pay grades and salary bands, which may not purely reflect their rank although that would be a significant factor.
    To try to reflect British ranks or American ranks very closely in a translation, would probably add confusion, so, if 'fonctionnel' is a matter of rank or pay, I think 'senior' implies this sufficiently without being too precise and therefore potentially inaccurate.
     

    Malcius

    Senior Member
    English - England
    An operational Police Commander or an active Police Commander.
    'Active" would just mean that they are currently in service and not yet retired.
    'Operational' would imply something to do with the nature of their duties. Perhaps, if police commander were more of an administrative desk job or one concerned with more day-to-day policing, an 'operational' police commander might be responsible for planning and/or directing special operations. It would not specifically denote higher rank or salary as suggested by catheng06.
     
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