commit a bad foul

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azz

Senior Member
armenian
Can one say
a. If you commit a deliberate foul on someone once, you will be cautioned. If you commit a deliberate foul on someone again, you will be sent off.
b. If you commit a deliberate foul on someone once, you will be cautioned. If you commit a deliberate foul on someone twice, you will be sent off.

?

I wonder if (b) does not imply that you have to commit two fouls on the same person to be sent off! That is not the intended meaning.
I think (a) works.

Many thanks.
 
  • Wordnip

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think both are ambiguous. You would need to say 'deliberate foul on the same person again' or if you commit a deliberate foul on the same person twice. (Because 'someone' can be anyone).
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    I think that a) is clear enough but b) does give the impression that you will only be sent off if the same opponent is fouled twice.

    (By the way in your title you say 'bad foul' which is not mentioned in the opening post.)
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Can one say
    a. If you commit a deliberate foul on someone once, you will be cautioned. If you commit a deliberate foul on someone again, you will be sent off.
    b. If you commit a deliberate foul on someone once, you will be cautioned. If you commit a deliberate foul on someone twice, you will be sent off.

    ?

    I wonder if (b) does not imply that you have to commit two fouls on the same person to be sent off! That is not the intended meaning.
    I think (a) works.

    Many thanks.
    In all the codes I know, one can be sent off for one very serious foul. No replacement allowed.

    Some codes will specify how many "lesser" fouls one can clock up before being sent off, temporarily or permanently (no replacement allowed). It doesn't matter who you have fouled.

    There may be exceptions to this in the leagues on Mars. :D

    GF..

    Mind you, in answer to the original question you can say what you like.... Whether it reflects reality is another story.....
     

    azz

    Senior Member
    armenian
    Thank you all very much.
    Yes, I should not have included the word 'bad' in the title. I think if the 'foul' is not bad, but deliberate, the player will be cautioned. But I am not sure. I don't know the regulations that well. I just wanted to figure out how the grammar worked.

    Many Thanks.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Are there "fouls" in soccer/football (I aussume that's what we're talking about) that are not "on someone" (i.e. involving another player)? If not, the ambiguity could be resolved, and the sentence could be tightened, simply by eliminating those words:

    If you commit a deliberate foul once, you will be cautioned. If you commit a deliberate foul again, you will be sent off.

    (In American football, all rules violations, including technical ones such as not having proper padding, are called "fouls.")
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    ...If you commit a deliberate foul once, you will be cautioned. If you commit a deliberate foul again, you will be sent off...
    How about "Foul me once, shame on you. Foul me twice, shame on me" :D


    Seriously though I think you have a good solution. Maybe it could be modified a little,"If you commit a deliberate foul you will be cautioned. If you commit a second deliberate foul, you will be sent off."
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    How about "Foul me once, shame on you. Foul me twice, shame on me" :D


    Seriously though I think you have a good solution. Maybe it could be modified a little,"If you commit a deliberate foul you will be cautioned. If you commit a second deliberate foul, you will be sent off."
    I agree. With both versions. :D I like yours better, but I'm always concerned about doing too much rewriting here.
     

    azz

    Senior Member
    armenian
    Thank you very much Pob14 and Biffo!

    Your solutions are elegant. I wanted to know how it would work with 'someone'.

    I did not want to bring this up, but this question arose when I saw this:

    http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/socce...ent-during-italy-uruguay-match-175855668.html

    Now, you can't say 'to commit a deliberate bite' can you?!!!

    Towards the end of the article, it is written:

    But as the saying goes, "Bite someone once, shame on you. Bite someone else, shame on you again. Bite someone a third time, and what is wrong with you?!?! Stop biting people!"

    You see? It says 'bite some a third time;..... Hence my question!

    And three cheers for Biffo!

    Foul me once, shame on you. Foul me twice, off with you! Foul me a third time, shame on the referee!

    Take care.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    You see? It says 'bite someone a third time;..... Hence my question!
    Well, that's a different situation. As I said, I think in soccer, a "foul" is always "against someone." But biting . . . You can bite your sandwich at halftime, you can bite your lip, you can bite a towel if you get frustrated. But if you bite "someone" - that's a problem. (If you do it three times, it's a big problem.)
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    But you are allowed to make biting remarks.
    It's called sledging.. Me to opponent:- "You don't know where your arse is, let alone where the goal is."

    GF..

    It's just part of the nearly all modern team games.... It's been there ever since I played any sport.. And that's a long time ago.
    Is it allowed? You don't normally get sent off for this or deducted points or whatever...

    Sometimes both antagonists end up in hysterics. And in the bar they continue the banter.

    If it gets too bad the sport's organising board does take action and give sanctions and fines... But that hardly ever happens....
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Well, that's a different situation. As I said, I think in soccer, a "foul" is always "against someone." But biting . . . You can bite your sandwich at halftime, you can bite your lip, you can bite a towel if you get frustrated. But if you bite "someone" - that's a problem. (If you do it three times, it's a big problem.)
    Sadly it's based on fact.

    As Italy sank into despondency over bombing out of the World Cup, a few people at least were able to see a funny side to the debacle – social media on Wednesday was abuzz with satirical depictions of Luis Suarez, the Uruguayan striker, biting an Italian player.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...-striker-for-bite-as-team-exit-World-Cup.html
     
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