commitment vs. engagement

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lapachis8

Senior Member
Mexico-Spanish
Hi.
I´ve checked in the Merriam-Webster on line, but still cannot figure out the difference between commitment and engagement. Any ideas?
cheers
 
  • TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    Can you provide links to the MW definitions and/or some examples of the contexts where you'd like to use these words?

    They can have similar meanings, but I don't use them interchangeably. A commitment typically means that you have (agreed to) an obligation.

    Colleague A: Can you come to a meeting at 2 p.m. today?
    Colleague B: I'm sorry, I already have a commitment for that time. I have to meet with a client.

    An engagement can also be an obligation, but in AE, it is most commonly used to refer to:
    (a) the period of betrothal prior to marriage, or
    (b) the act of having been hired for a specific project.

    Colleague A: Has your new client signed an engagement letter yet?
    Colleague B: No, we're still negotiating some of the terms.

    Elisabetta
     

    kayokid

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Hello.
    As I see it, a commitment is an agreement or pledge to do something.
    ex. He made a commitment to repay the loan in a year.

    An engagement most often refers to an impending marriage.
    ex. My brother and his fiance are planning a very short engagement. He plans to get married in 3 months.

    In somewhat elevated language one can also say: I have a dinner engagement tonight Mr. Trump. (I am having dinner with him.)

    Hope this helps.
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    kayokid said:
    In somewhat elevated language one can also say: I have a dinner engagement tonight Mr. Trump. (I am having dinner with him.
    In this last context, engagement is similar to appointment, but referring to a social event. Appointment would tend to be used in reference to things like meeting your doctor, lawyer, financial advisor, etc.

    Elisabetta
     

    lapachis8

    Senior Member
    Mexico-Spanish
    Thanks!
    Ok, this is the context, (I`m not sure if it the original is properly written. I´m translating it):

    "(we)... hopefully provide more insight into students´motivational beliefs and into the way these beliefs affect their involvement, commitment and engagement in the life classroom."

    cheers
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    In this case, engagement means their active participation in the classroom, while commitment is the extent of their dedication. Engagement and involvement are the words that seem redundant to me.

    Elisabetta
     

    lapachis8

    Senior Member
    Mexico-Spanish
    Thanks Elisabetta
    I agree. I´m translating into Spanish and the equivalent of both words is compromiso, that is what confused me.
    Thank again.
    cheers
     
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