Commonly used synonyms of "Don't rush me."

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Brave Heart

Senior Member
Japan, Japanese
Hi all,

Are there commonly used synonyms of "Don't rush me" when you want to complain about someone's pressing hard on you to finish your work as soon as possible ?

I guess "Don't speed me" or "Don't hurry me up" might be possible alternatives but when I "googled", I found few of those phrases, and that's why I decided to ask about this in this forum.

Thanks. :)
 
  • mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Chill out! might work in context, but really means Get off my back!
    Slow down! is another, but, again it is telling the other person to slow down.

    Don't rush me! is a good one....
     

    LouisaB

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I agree that 'Don't rush me!' is the best.

    If you really want a synonym, 'Don't hurry me!' is all right - used without the 'up'.

    Under certain circumstances, 'Don't hassle me for this' can work. I've even heard 'Don't stampede me!' but I didn't get many hits on google for that one.

    Louisa
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Hi all,

    Are there commonly used synonyms of "Don't rush me" when you want to complain about someone's pressing hard on you to finish your work as soon as possible ?

    I guess "Don't speed me" or "Don't hurry me up" might be possible alternatives but when I "googled", I found few of those phrases, and that's why I decided to ask about this in this forum.

    Thanks. :)
    I usually say: "Be patient" or "Patience is a virtue" (the second one is only used among my best friends with a tone when we are saying it)

    I think "chill out" is not a bad one at all.
     

    Brave Heart

    Senior Member
    Japan, Japanese
    Thank you all. I appreciate your help. :)

    It seems there are a lot more phrases to tell the other person to slow down than those to request him/her not to bother me (= the speaker). :)
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Thank you all. I appreciate your help. :)

    It seems there are a lot more phrases to tell the other person to slow down than those to request him/her not to bother me (= the speaker). :)
    If that's what you are looking for, then I'll say: "Bugger off!'

    Edit: "Get off my back" is a nice one in this case too.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    "Keep your pants on!"
    "Keep your shirt on!"
    "Where's the fire!"
    The question was posed as "...when you want to complain about someone's pressing hard on you to finish your work as soon as possible ?"

    If that someone is your boss, none of the suggestions above would be appropriate. The first two
    might get you fired!

    These are all good equivalents to "Don't rush me." The last one was in widespread use in AE
    in the 1940s and 1950s, and is rarely heard today, though it is still in use.

    I think we need more specific background to provide useful suggestions. What is the relationship of the speaker to the "someone"? Are they colleagues, manager and subordinate, friends?

    Many of the suggestions in this thread would be very good, or very bad, depending on that relationship.

    Some day, in my dreams, all threads will begin with adequate background and context,
    but Rome wasn't built in a day.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    If you want to sound like someone from the late 19th or early 20th century, there is "Haste makes waste".
    Similar in tone is "Slow and steady wins the race", which will be useless if the listener hasn't heard the fable of the tortoise and the hare.
     

    Brave Heart

    Senior Member
    Japan, Japanese
    Thanks all. I appreciate your help. :)

    Hi cuchuflete. Sorry for not giving sufficient context. I've assumed a dialogue with a close colleague/friend (or maybe just a mumble :D). If it were with my boss, I would say something like, "I'm sorry but could you give me another hour, please?" Would it work alright?

    I didn't know that "Where's the fire?" is rarely heard today.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I've assumed a dialogue with a close colleague/friend (or maybe just a mumble :D).

    If it were with my boss, I would say something like, "I'm sorry but could you give me another hour, please?" Would it work alright?
    Yes, that would be wise. :D

    Among close friends, you could use any of the suggested phrases in this thread.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    ....and also "Yer don't git nowhere by bein' too 'asty" as featured in the vintage humorous song "Right, said Fred" in which the unfortunate furniture remover of that name ends up under "arf a ton o' rubble".
     

    LouisaB

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    In the last few years, one of the most popular replies to this kind of hassling that I've heard has been 'Do you want it fast, or do you want it good?'

    It usually does the trick....

    Louisa
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Cool your jets!
    Hold on!
    Just give me a moment here!

    I've been trying to think of a diplomatic way to put this to such a person as one's boss, but nothing comes to mind!

    "I've been trying to prioritize my responsibilities, and unfortunately there are some more pressing issues that I need to attend to first; I will get to this as soon as practicable."

    An awful bit of jargon and double talk; just the perfect thing to say to a boss.
     
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