company's restaurant? canteen? cafeteria?

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AntiScam

Senior Member
Arabic
All,

What do you call a building that has a bakery and cooks food for thousands of employees of different companies that work in a small industrial city? The building serves food to employees in a metal container molded into plates and bowls. The employees sit at four-chair attached tables.

The employees line up and get served with food they choose as they move on.

Could you give the answer in US and UK Englishes, please?

Thanks
 
Last edited:
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    At my University it was called "food service". If it is self-serve, then "cafeteria" works also. Those are the two top choices for me in the USA.
     

    AntiScam

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Thank you Packard.

    The employees go through a line and get to choose food. The 'food service' workers put food in the metal container.
    By the way, does any one know what that container called?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Are you referring to one of these: http://www.everythingreenstore.com/assets/images/kitchen/TGW-3T-a.jpg

    I believe it is an Indian container called a "tiffen" or "tiffin".

    In the USA we'd probably call it a "three tiered stainless steel meal container" or something like that.

    I understand that they leak if they are not held upright. In any case we do not see these often in the USA. I did see it on TV on an episode of one of the cooking shows with Chef Ramsay.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I'd call it a "canteen" in the UK. The description makes it sound a bit utilitarian to describe as a "cafeteria" although that is the other main possibility.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Not self-service in that you don't have to cook for yourself, perhaps. But you would have to get on line and collect your items and then carry the tray to your table. Afterwards you would have to bus your dishes to some counter. I call that "self-service" and all the cafeterias I have been in follow that format.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I'd call it a "canteen" in the UK. The description makes it sound a bit utilitarian to describe as a "cafeteria" although that is the other main possibility.
    From my experience cafeterias in main are utilitarian.

    Here is an image of a school cafeteria, and it is not too lavish: http://www.mspaceholdings.com/sites/default/files/case-study/Louisa- Interior Cafeteria Benches.jpg

    This one is nicer and probably more typical: http://school.fultonschools.org/es/cogburnwoods/PublishingImages/Cafeteria 2 Small.jpg



    Here are some images of cafeterias: https://www.google.com/search?q=caf...a=X&ei=KZElVcGfG8yBygSWmIGYDQ&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ

    They are most notable for the bright lights, formica toopped tables, and often plastic chairs.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Getting back to the original question:

    What do you call a building that has a bakery and cooks food for thousands of employees of different companies that work in a small industrial city?
    I've never encountered such a place.....it's certainly not the company cafeteria that I'm familiar with. :confused:
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with SDG that there is no single word in English that specifically fits the description that Antiscam has provided.

    A place that serves food to employees at the counter is sometimes called a canteen or cafeteria. Canteen in British English connotes a rather basic facility often suitable for manual workers in a factory.

    Many large firms provide excellent food service for their employees with a wide range of good quality food and other refreshments. Google is famous for the provision of up-market food service for its employees and official visitors, for example in London, Dublin and many other key centres and usually refers to them as "restaurants".
     
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