comparable to some of the best in France.

Julianus

Senior Member
Korean
Hello.

1a. The identical claim, expressed in two social contexts, may have different qualifiers. When talking among friends, you might say, “Lucé is the world’s finest restaurant.” When speaking to a group of French chefs, you might find yourself saying, “Lucé is an excellent restaurant, comparable to some of the best in France.” (Korea universtiy entrance exam)

2a. “Lucé is an excellent restaurant, comparable to some of the best restaurants in France.”
2b. “Lucé is an excellent restaurant, comparable to some of the best things in France.”

As far as I know, 'the best' is the superlative and an adjecitve. Threfore, 'a noun' should be used after 'the best' but in this sentence, 'a noun' is ommited. I want to know why the omission like this occur. Is this because the same word is being used like 2a or because 'the best' always means the best things or the best thing like 2b: is it because things or thing is not needed?

Thank you always~.
 
  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    As far as I know, 'the best' is the superlative and an adjecitve.
    Have you tried looking up "best" in the dictionary? There are twelve different definitions for "best" as a noun.

    English speakers like to use words in new ways. We often make nouns out of verbs and verbs out of adjectives and so on... Over time, very common words are used in many different ways, and those ways become standardized as words. So "best" is at this point in history an adjective, an adverb, a noun, and a verb!
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    No, not "the best things," but "the best restaurants." We aren't talking about things in general; rather, we're only interested in restaurants.
     

    idialegre

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "...an excellent restaurant, comparable to some of the best in France" definitely means, "...some of the best restaurants in France."

    When we repeat an adjective and omit the noun, it is almost always because exactly that noun has already been used immediately beforehand.

    "Are we using the silver forks or the gold?" (Already, you understand that it means "gold forks.")
    "The gold."

    Speaking for Americans, I would say that it is more common to replace the missing noun with the word "one" or "ones."

    "Do you want to wear the black tie or the blue tie?"
    "The black one."

    But you could also answer simply, "The black."
     
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