comparative degree of full

< Previous | Next >

seanhu

Senior Member
Chinese
Does the word full has its comparative form or superlative form? If has, what's them? Fuller? Fullest?
If hasn't, how could I express the same meaning in other forms? Thanks in advance!
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    If something (a cup, for example) is full, it cannot be more so, since there is no more room in it. Therefore, there is no comparative and no superlative.

    What meaning do you want to express, Seanhu?
     

    seanhu

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thanks Parla. If I want to say "give sb a deeper and fuller understanding of something", how could I express the same meaning in right ways?
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Yes, when you need a comparative or superlative form of "full", the correct forms are "fuller" and "fullest", but "more full" and "most full" are sometimes valid alternatives.

    Some phrases, such as "to the fullest" or "to the fullest extent", would sound odd with "most full", so it really depends on what you mean to say.

    EDIT: I would say "a fuller understanding", not "a more full understanding". To me "deeper" and "fuller" are different aspects of understanding.
     

    seanhu

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Well, now the question seems like having two different answers, so I'm puzzled again.

    Which advice should I take, could anyone else help me?
     

    AmaryllisBunny

    Senior Member
    English (AmE)
    I agree with Forero.

    Deeper meaning a more thorough/detailed understanding (understanding the intricacies), whereas fuller means a more complete understanding (better overall).
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top