Comparative form of the adjective "rough"

Diddl

Senior Member
Italian -Italy
Hello everybody,
I have recently read the following sentence:
<<The stone of the Porta Nigra is not as smoothed over as the stone of the Colosseum or the Theater of Marcellus; it's left in a much more rough state>>.
Now, according to my English grammar book, single-syllable adjectives and two-syllable adjectives ending with "y", "er", "le" or "ow" take the suffix -er to form the comparative. "Rough" is not in the list of exceptions.
Is there an explanation? Can anyone help? Thank you in advance and have a great afternoon.
Bye!
 
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  • Diddl

    Senior Member
    Italian -Italy
    "Rougher" would be a better choice there. "Smoothed over" is also a little odd. Do you know who wrote this? Where did you find it?
    Thank you JamesM. I found this in the transcript of a lecture about architecture delivered by an American art historian. I therefore assume these expressions sound odd because they belong to a "spoken language" register. As far as I am concerned what matters is that I am now sure that "rougher" is correct :) Thank you!
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    "More rough" isn't absolutely wrong, it's just unusual. It can sound awkward in certain contexts. "Rougher" is a safer bet. :) Artists tend to use language in unusual ways to make a point or draw attention to a feature (and sometimes they're just not quite articulate ;) ).
     
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