Complain

eno2

Senior Member
Dutch-Flemish
Hi,
I think there are 2 verbs possible for complain, for instance in this context: <She always complains about the hard job she has to do for such low wages >
διαμαρτύρομαι
παραπονιέμαι

A search in WR gives:
παραπονιέμαι complain grumble whine
διαμαρτύρομαι protest

That's a big difference.

Pons gives 'beschweren' (German) for διαμαρτύρομαι, so that means 'to complain'. With the example: <Το μόνο που κάνει ο Μάρτι είναι να διαμαρτύρεται.>

The result of the WR definition is that I'm uncertain about διαμαρτύρομαι
 
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  • Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    A search in WR gives:
    παραπονιέμαι complain grumble whine
    διαμαρτύρομαι protest
    Yes, this is how I know them.

    παραπονιέμαι is to say that you are annoyed, unsatisfied with something.
    διαμαρτύρομαι is to express disagreement or opposition to something.

    Since you've referred to German, διαμαρτύρομαι is also protestieren. Cf. Διαμαρτυρόμενοι or Προτεστάντες means Protestants.
     

    dmtrs

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Hi eno2,
    In English:
    A1. She complains about her hard work. (complains=whines, grumbles)
    But also:
    A2. She complained to the authorities. - She made/filed a complaint. (more official, where complain(t) is close to protest)

    B1. Thousands protested against climate change.
    But also:
    B2.The babies protested until they were held by their parents.

    It's the same thing in Greek; although διαμαρτύρομαι is usually used similarly to protest in B1 and παραπονιέμαι like complain in A1, they are both very often used as protest and complain in B2 and A2 respectively, resulting to the two words being almost exact synonyms in some uses.

    (Posting the same time as Perseas.)
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    dmtrs is right. I basically have referred to their 'default' meanings, but in some cases as in A2 these terms overlap each other
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    On the one hand I'm glad there's some overlap because I like very much διαμαρτύρομαι for its root word μαρτύρ which is not so much a protester as a passive suffering victim that has all reasons to 'sound as a martyr'=complain as in <<She always complains about the hard job she has to do for such low wages >

    On the other hand, I'm not sure now if I could use it in that sentence. She surely behaves like a martyr, but I would have to play it safe and use παραπονιέμαι because of the default meanings.


    . Cf. Διαμαρτυρόμενοι or Προτεστάντες means Protestants.
    Ah. So that's a very clear use of 'protest' indeed.

    Since you've referred to German, διαμαρτύρομαι is also protestieren
    Yes, I've got that now. But of course this διαμαρτύρομαι =beschweren= complain equates it to παραπονιέμαι
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    On the one hand I'm glad there's some overlap because I like very much διαμαρτύρομαι for its root word μαρτύρ which is not so much a protester as a passive suffering victim that has all reasons to 'sound as a martyr'=complain as in <<She always complains about the hard job she has to do for such low wages >

    On the other hand, I'm not sure now if I could use it in that sentence. She surely behaves like a martyr, but I would have to play it safe and use παραπονιέμαι because of the default meanings.
    I'd also prefer "παραπονιέται" in this sentence. It makes her look more like a 'victim' than using "διαμαρτύρεται".

    About the etymology of "διαμαρτύρομαι": Its initial meaning in Ancient Greek was "to call gods and men to witness", "protest solemnly". The person who witnesses is called "μάρτυς" or, in Aeolian Greek, "μάρτυρ". The meaning of "martyr" (in English "the person who suffers") is newer.

    Of course you can just say κάνω παράπονο/α. :cool:
    Yes, exactly.
     
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