complejizar el problema

athiieh

Senior Member
Castellano, Argentina
¡Hola, amigos foreros!
¿Hay alguna forma quizás de traducir 'complejizar' al inglés?
Esto significa volver algo más complejo -'complejizar el problema' - , peor tiene connotación positiva, es visto como algo bueno o neutro, y por esto 'to complicate' no me convence.

¡¡¡Gracias!!!
 
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  • loudspeaker

    Senior Member
    British English
    hola amigos foreros!
    hay alguna forma quizás de traducir 'complejizar' al inglés?
    Esto significa volver algo más complejo -'complejizar el problema' - , peor tiene connotación positiva, es visto como algo bueno o neutro, y por esto 'to complicate' no me convence.

    gracias!!!

    Se me ocurre 'compound a problem/difficulty'. He buscado 'complejizar' en varios diccionarios, y no existe.
    Tampoco entiendo qué quieres decir con 'peor tiene connotación positiva'.
     

    obz

    Senior Member
    Yankee English
    Creo que quiere decir 'pero tiene.."

    Desconozco "complejizar", pero sí, lo veo en unos diccionarios del internet...

    There is convolute, compound, exacerbate, deepen, etc as verbs that will make problems more complex, or worse... but 'complicate' is surely the most common.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Because the first translation here renders "... sino que permite complejizar el análisis de la realidad" as " ... but it also enables a more complex analysis of reality", I suggest "look at the problem in greater depth."
     

    athiieh

    Senior Member
    Castellano, Argentina
    ¡Qué enlace más bárbaro!!! Muchas gracias sound shift, muchas gracias a todos.

    Sí, era 'pero', perdón por el error de tipeo.
     
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    loudspeaker

    Senior Member
    British English
    Because the first translation here renders "... sino que permite complejizar el análisis de la realidad" as " ... but it also enables a more complex analysis of reality", I suggest "look at the problem in greater depth."
    I don't think Linguee is a reliable source. It's about as reliable as a chocolate fireguard.
    :D
     

    e42mercury

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    I am working on an academic document that uses "complejizar." In this case, the best translation is "problematize". It maintains the positive tone and the idea, and works better than other suggestions here.
     

    el Rey Tiburon

    Member
    USA
    English - US
    Hola foreros,

    Llego algo tarde a la discusión, pero agrego otra posibilidad que es tal vez más próxima a la raíz de complejizar (aunque me gustan mucho "to convolute, compound, problematize").

    Sugiero "to perplex," que en su segunda acepción significa "to make intricate or involved: complicate" (según Merriam-Webster online).

    ¡Saludos!
     

    eleonb

    Senior Member
    Español, Chile
    Hola! I know it's an old post, but still: I've noticed that in English "sophisticated" is very similar to our "complejo/a (with a positive connotation)".
    So maybe you can use "to sophisticate / to make more sophisticated".
    What do the English natives think?
     

    CaMaCa

    New Member
    English-Australia
    Hi all. I´m here for a similar reason, albeit 5 years after original post. As I come from Spanish parents (Bilbao) yet born, bred (and buttered;)) in Melbourne, Australia and have lived here in Madrid for over 30 years, I´m led to believe that the use of the word "complejizarlo" in this sentence (about dog training in a Covid 19 world) is unnecessarily........ pedantic :
    "Por otro lado, hemos visto cómo desarrollar medidas para que, en ausencia de la actividad física del paseo y de la estimulación que encuentran en el exterior, poder enriquecer el entorno y complejizarlo para que resulte de mayor interés para ellos. My translators sense urges me to omit it entirely and leave it as : Furthermore, we have seen how to develop measures so that in the absence of the physical activity offered by the walk and the outdoor stimulation this offers, we are able to enrich the environment and thus make it more interesting for them.
    All useful help and practical comments most welcome.
     

    Bilis

    Senior Member
    United Kingdom
    Hi CaMaCa, it seems to me that complejizar is almost entirely superfluous in your text. Immediately beforehand it talks about "enriching the environment", so, literally speaking, making a dog's environment "more complex" would certainly easily be encompassed by the former. And of course, immediately afterwards it mentions making that environment more interesting too.
    I doubt saying pretty much the same thing a third time would be of much use, so yes, definitely leave it out in my opinion!
     

    Marsianitoh

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Spain
    Hi CaMaCa, it seems to me that complejizar is almost entirely superfluous in your text. Immediately beforehand it talks about "enriching the environment", so, literally speaking, making a dog's environment "more complex" would certainly easily be encompassed by the former. And of course, immediately afterwards it mentions making that environment more interesting too.
    I doubt saying pretty much the same thing a third time would be of much use, so yes, definitely leave it out in my opinion!
    I agree. Anyway, if CaMaCa wants to add something I think he could say " make it more challenging" to translate "complejizarlo"( by the way, it's the first time I've heard this word, it sounds wrong).
     

    CaMaCa

    New Member
    English-Australia
    I'm very pleased to read both comments from Bilis and Marianhito. Feels great to confer with such knowledgeable and logical people. Thanks again folks.
    .
    Excuse me. Typo. Lost the S.. Thanks MarSianhito! I totally agree. It sounds like false "newsweek" to me too.
     
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