complex sentence

chobalsim

Senior Member
Korea, Korean
Aquinas attempts to overcome the conflict in traditions of moral reflection on justice between Augustine and Aristotle--to boot, for Augustine, the sin of the Romans who inherited Greek ideas of virtue, was their pride, manifest in their hunger for glory, against which Augustine places the Christian value of humility, while pride as a vice is absent in Aristotle.

The bold part makes me confused. I paraphrased the first part of the sentence like this; To boot the sin, considered by Romans as sin, was their(Romans) pride. Is it right??? But what makes me confused the most is "manifest." Is it a verb here???
Would you please paraphrase the bold sentence in a foolproof way? :(
 
  • chobalsim said:
    Aquinas attempts to overcome the conflict in traditions of moral reflection on justice between Augustine and Aristotle--to boot, for Augustine, the sin of the Romans who inherited Greek ideas of virtue, was their pride, manifest in their hunger for glory, against which Augustine places the Christian value of humility, while pride as a vice is absent in Aristotle.

    The bold part makes me confused. I paraphrased the first part of the sentence like this; To boot the sin, considered by Romans as sin, was their(Romans) pride. Is it right??? But what makes me confused the most is "manifest." Is it a verb here???
    Would you please paraphrase the bold sentence in a foolproof way? :(
    Hi Chobalsim,

    . . . . .to boot, Augustine considered that pride was the sin of the Romans, who inherited Greek ideas of virtue. This was manifest in their hunger for glory, . . . . . .

    manifest (adjective) = very obvious, shown clearly.

    Manifest is also a verb. "They manifested their hunger for glory by their behaviour."



    LRV
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    chobalsim said:
    Aquinas attempts to overcome the conflict in traditions of moral reflection on justice between Augustine and Aristotle--to boot, for Augustine, the sin of the Romans who inherited Greek ideas of virtue, was their pride, manifest in their hunger for glory, against which Augustine places the Christian value of humility, while pride as a vice is absent in Aristotle.

    The bold part makes me confused. I paraphrased the first part of the sentence like this; To boot the sin, considered by Romans as sin, was their(Romans) pride. Is it right??? But what makes me confused the most is "manifest." Is it a verb here???
    Would you please paraphrase the bold sentence in a foolproof way? :(
    I think that "to boot" here means "as well", "also".

    Also, for Augustine, the sin of the Romans was their pride.
     

    chobalsim

    Senior Member
    Korea, Korean
    Timpeac, thanks a million!!!
    I thought "to boot" means "to expell", which made me so confused.
    Thank you!
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    chobalsim said:
    Timpeac, thanks a million!!!
    I thought "to boot" means "to expell", which made me so confused.
    Thank you!
    Yes, I had a feeling you did!:D Glad it helped.:)

    It reminds me of a job advert I saw in a comedy book saying "salary xxx, location xxx, flat included and a servant to boot!":)
     

    coconutpalm

    Senior Member
    Chinese,China
    I referred to my dictionary, which states that "to boot" is dated. Is it still used today?
    I notice the sentence chob quoted is kind of old, so maybe "to boot" fits well in this context?
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    coconutpalm said:
    I referred to my dictionary, which states that "to boot" is dated. Is it still used today?
    I notice the sentence chob quoted is kind of old, so maybe "to boot" fits well in this context?
    Maybe a bit dated - but certainly not out of use, I think. I'd say I use it from time to time...
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top