complicity - demanding

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Magg

Senior Member
Spain / Spanish
From the information in a CV, an English-speaking teacher has underlined two mistakes but he hasn't given me any other options. Well, for one of them he has written something that I'm unable to decipher.
Here is the paragraph:

I am an easy-going person, with capacity for personal relationships and a special complicity with the students. At the same time, I am firm, demanding and responsible at my job.

For complicity=nothing
For demanding=something like ¿eracting? Does iti give you a clue?

What are your suggestions?

Magg
 
  • anothersmith

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    I would replace "complicity" with "relationship" and "exacting" with "demanding."


    "Complicity" suggests something negative; a conspiracy between you and the students. Usually, someone is "complicit" in a crime.

    "Demanding" can suggest that a person is unreasonable in their requests. "Exacting" is a more neutral term.

    I hope this helps!
     

    Magg

    Senior Member
    Spain / Spanish
    I would replace "complicity" with "relationship" and "exacting" with "demanding."


    "Complicity" suggests something negative; a conspiracy between you and the students. Usually, someone is "complicit" in a crime.

    "Demanding" can suggest that a person is unreasonable in their requests. "Exacting" is a more neutral term.

    I hope this helps!
    Definitely.
    It must be exacting.
    But the thing is that relationship is already used in the sentence.
    What about 'afinity'? Does it sound good in English?
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Hi Magg,

    Here's another suggestion:

    I am an easy-going person, with a knack for personal relationships and a special camaraderie with the students. At the same time, I am firm but fair, consistent, and responsible at my job.



    AngelEyes


     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "Self-demanding" would work. You are unreasonably demanding of yourself, i.e., you are highly driven.
     

    AWordLover

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Correct me if I'm wrong but one doesn't haven't an affinity "with" something/someone, does one? I've always thought one had an affinity "for" something or someone...
    Hi,
    This is from the American Heritage Dictionary.
    Usage Note: In the sense of "attraction," affinity may be followed by of, between, or with. Thus one may speak of the close affinity of James and Samuel, or of the affinity between James and Samuel, or of James's affinity with Samuel. In its chemical use affinity is generally followed by for: a dye with an affinity for synthetic fabrics. · One might want to avoid using affinity as a simple synonym for liking since 62 percent of the Usage Panel rejects the example Her affinity for living in California led her to reject a chance to return to New York. Nevertheless, the more sophisticated tone inherent in this use of the word can lend an archness to certain contexts, as when Barbara Tuchman writes of Kaiser Wilhelm's "affinity for coarse physical jokes practiced upon his courtiers." This may be why 65 percent of the Usage Panel approved of this quotation when it was presented as an example.​
     
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