composed of v. consist of v. comprise v. contain v. embrace v. include.

hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
This is the original: "The house comprises 2 bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room."

Which of the followings correct or idiomatic?

1) The house is composed of 2 bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room.

2) The house consists of 2 bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room.

3) The house contains 2 bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room.

4) The house embraces 2 bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room.

5) The house includes 2 bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room.

6) 2 bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room constitute the house.

Source: Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English.

Thank you.
 
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  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    2) is incorrect, although it's fine if you drop the "is" before "consists." With that change, 2) might be the best choice. Of the rest, 4) sounds a bit silly.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    2) is incorrect, although it's fine if you drop the "is" before "consists." With that change, 2) might be the best choice. Of the rest, 4) sounds a bit silly.
    I have changed it as "is consisted of". What do you think about this passive form?

    Thank you.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I like "has".

    The house has three bedrooms...

    "Includes" sounds fine too.

    It is not "consisted of" it is "consists of".
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Then, all the other idiomatic? Thank you.
    1) The house is composed of 2 bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room.:tick:

    2) The house is consisted of 2 bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room.:cross:

    3) The house contains 2 bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room.:cross:

    4) The house embraces 2 bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room.:cross:

    5) The house includes 2 bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room.:tick:

    6) 2 bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room constitute the house.:cross:
     
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