comprare qualcosa da qualcuno

macta123

Senior Member
India,Hindi
Hi,

I don't know Italian as such. I am learning French.

There we use acheter quelqu'chose à quelqu'un (to buy something from someone).

So, I was wondering which preposition is used in Italian and why? (da or a) # Since both are of Latin origin!
 
  • raffaella

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    Hi, I am afraid "acheter quelquechose A quelqu'un" means FOR/TO someone and not FROM.
    So here are your aptions:

    To buy something from someone (he sold something to you)> Comperare /comprare qualcosa da qualcuno

    To buy something for someone (you are buying a present)>
    Comperare/comprare qualcosa per/a qualcuno.


    I hope this helps,

    Raffaella
     

    raffaella

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    Can you please give a specific example?
    I don't think I am familiar with this use of à=from. Are you buying from a person, in a shop...

    Raffaella
     

    macta123

    Senior Member
    India,Hindi
    From a person

    In French it is quite like that

    acheter qqch à qqn => Can be from (in on context) and to (in other)
     

    raffaella

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    I got that, can you write two examples showing the different meaning so that I can give you the Italian equivalent?
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    acheter quelque chose à quelqu'un (to buy something from someone).

    If you were to buy something from someone, I would rather say:

    acheter qqch de qqn. (buy something from someone )

    acheter qqch. à/pour qqn. (buy something for somebody)

    The same rule applies to all the Latin languages, the ones that I know anyway.

    Go check it out if you don't believe me or let a native take a look!

    :) robbie
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    If you were to but something from someone, I would rather say:

    acheter qqch de qqn. (buy something from someone )

    acheter qqch. à/pour qqn. (buy something for somebody)

    The same rule applies to all the Latin languages, the ones that I know anyway.
    Not to all. ;)
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    In Portuguese, "Comprar algo a alguém" is ambivalent. It can mean to buy something for someone, or to buy something from someone.
    We never say comprar de in Portugal (I'm not sure about Brazil). We do say comprar para, which means "to buy for".
     

    raffaella

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    Okay, the only way I can think of using the French "à" meaning "from" is if it is used to indicate possession not origin.
    For example:

    J'ai acheté un des chapeaux à Paul > J'ai acheté un des chapeaux qui sont à Paul

    That would be:

    "Ho comprato uno dei cappelli di Paul" > I bought one of Paul's hats.

    But it still sounds weird. I hope the original poster will come up with an enlightening example because I couldn't do better than this...

    Raffaella
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    It is .... à qqn ... in both the cases. It is ambivalent as in Portugese.

    Now why is this ambivalance?

    Sorry, but it doesn't seem to add upp. I don't think that "à" can be used to mean "from", except in this situation; "quant à moi".

    :) robbie
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    In Portuguese, "Comprar algo a alguém" is ambivalent. It can mean to buy something for someone, or to buy something from someone.
    We never say comprar de in Portugal (I'm not sure about Brazil). We do say comprar para, which means "to buy for".
    Only in literary texts can you find comprar algo a alguem meaning to buy something from someone. In daily life, we say comprar algo de alguem = to buy something from someone and comprar algo para alguem = to buy something for someone.
     
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