comulgar una piedra de molino.

Eclisse

New Member
Italian
Hi, I've encountered this sentence: "Creo que nos quieren hacer comulgar una piedra de molino." The context is comment on a statement about the Spanish Civil War. Literally, sounds like: "I think that those who made the statement are trying to communicate us with a millstone". I guess the meaning could be: "... trying to force us to believe to a tall tale" or something similar.

Anybody could help me? Thank You in advance!
 
  • daydreamer

    Senior Member
    spain/spanish
    Yes, you've more of less got the meaning: They're trying to make us believe something downright unbelievable, or abide with something outrageous.

    Nevertheless, you'll usually hear it with "ruedas" (not "piedras"), and in the plural: "comulgar (o hacer comulgar) con ruedas de molino". In fact, I had never heard it in the singular, or with "piedras".
     

    daydreamer

    Senior Member
    spain/spanish
    By the way, just to make sure you get the image, the metaphor: "comulgar", literally, means to take the (holy, catholic) communion, to take the host, something you do willingly and with holy respect. A millstone is round, like the host, only it's huge, thick, hard and undigestible...
     

    STINGGUY

    Senior Member
    Español
    Hi, I've encountered this sentence: "Creo que nos quieren hacer comulgar una piedra de molino." The context is comment on a statement about the Spanish Civil War. Literally, sounds like: "I think that those who made the statement are trying to communicate us with a millstone". I guess the meaning could be: "... trying to force us to believe to a tall tale" or something similar.

    Anybody could help me? Thank You in advance!
    Dear Eclisse,
    I would say that "comulgar con ruedas de molino", i.e. to make us swallow what is unacceptable, has the English version in the expression:
    "swallow hook, line, and sinker". So I would dare say: They want us to swallow hook, line, and sinker"
    I hope it helps.

     

    Áristos

    Senior Member
    español (España)
    Dear Eclisse,
    I would say that "comulgar con ruedas de molino", i.e. to make us swallow what is unacceptable, has the English version in the expression:
    "swallow hook, line, and sinker". So I would dare say: They want us to swallow hook, line, and sinker"
    I hope it helps.

    Ha pasado bastante tiempo, pero acabo de leer esta sugerencia y no estoy de acuerdo.
    "Hook, line and sinker" hace referencia a creerte una cosa falsa, pero porque te engañan y acabas convencido. Sería "morder el anzuelo" o simplemente "picar".

    Nuestro "comulgar con ruedas de molino" implica que te obligan a aceptar algo, pero no por engaño. Simplemente, te ves obligado a tener que asumirlo aunque sabes que es injusto, inaceptable o inverosímil.

    El DRAE parece no obstante apoyar el sentido de morder el anzuelo, pero yo al menos en España debo discrepar. De hecho, se suele usar en frases negativas como "aunque esté en peligro tu trabajo, no comulgues con ruedas de molino" y situaciones así.

    Saludos
     
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