Con il sopraggiungere della primavera

mwebster

Senior Member
United States/English
Can someone help me with how one might say the following in English?
Con il sopraggiungere della primavera, non c'è niente da fare, mi sento crollare dal sonno e dormirei sempre.
Also how would you say "aprile dolce dormire"?
Thanks for the help
Mark
 
  • cecil

    Senior Member
    USA American English
    Mark,

    I'm fairly new at Italian, but I'll give your sentence a shot, knowing that better minds will follow and make adjustments.

    >>Con il sopraggiungere della primavera, non c'è niente da fare, mi sento crollare dal sonno e dormirei sempre.

    With the advent of spring, there's nothing to do; I feel myself collapsing with sleep as if I would sleep forever.

    I think the last few words are a bit odd. Literally "e dormirei sempre" = "and I would sleep forever," so I added the "as if" to try to render the sentence less awkward.

    >>aprile dolce dormire

    Literally it's "April sweet to sleep" or "Sweet April to sleep."

    cecil
     

    mwebster

    Senior Member
    United States/English
    Hi Cecil
    Thanks for the shot.

    Sentence in question:
    Con il sopraggiungere della primavera, non c'è niente da fare, mi sento crollare dal sonno e dormirei sempre.

    This is from a letter from an Italian friend who doesn't speak English (or I would ask them). While waiting for some help from this forum I gave it my own best guess at:


    "With the unexpected arrival of spring, with nothing pushing me, (or if there was nothing to do) I would collapse from sleepiness and always sleep."

    While literally I think your right about the "... spring, there's nothing to do", knowing this individual I suspect they would always have something to do.

    What do you think?
    Thanks
    Mark
     

    leenico

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. english
    Con il sopraggiungere della primavera, non c'è niente da fare, mi sento crollare dal sonno e dormirei sempre.
    I'll give it a try. I can always stand for some correction.

    With the unexpected arrival of spring, there is nothing to do. I feel like caving in to sleep, and to sleep forever. ;)
     

    leenico

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. english
    You are going to have to wait until tomorrow. I think that all the Italians are sleeping now. ;)
     

    cecil

    Senior Member
    USA American English
    >>"With the unexpected arrival of spring, with nothing pushing me, (or if there was nothing to do) I would collapse from sleepiness and always sleep."

    Mark,

    The first phrase could also be: "Given the sudden arrival of spring and nothing pushing me, I just collapse into what might seem like endless sleep." (Very free translation!) I still think the conditional "dormirei" is really weird. Could it be that Italians make grammatical mistakes!?! If it's correct, I hope somebody can explain its use here.

    cecil
     

    Manoo

    New Member
    Italy, italian
    hello Mark,
    here is a native italian to help!
    i think "non c'e' niente da fare" translates better as "nothing will/could help"
    also using "unexpected arrival" is not too correct, we all know when spring comes!
    i would try using "comes on"
    so:
    when spring comes on, nothing could help! ...and carrying on as cecil suggested (...I feel myself collapsing with sleep as if I would sleep forever!)
    or in other words:
    when spring comes nothing can stop me from falling asleep and sleep forever!

    hope that helps.
    manoo
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    mwebster said:
    Con il sopraggiungere della primavera, non c'è niente da fare, mi sento crollare dal sonno e dormirei sempre.
    When spring's arrived, there's nothing you can do about it, I feel myself collapsing with sleep and I would sleep all the time.

    Aprile dolce dormire = April, sweet sleeping, or it's sweet to sleep

    I hope you can find the right translation. Please correct my version as well.
     

    mwebster

    Senior Member
    United States/English
    Thanks Silvia I think you have the meaning. I appreciate your taking the time to give your translation. Is the phrase "non c'è niente da fare" commonly used in Italy?
    Thanks
    Mark
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    mwebster said:
    Is the phrase "non c'è niente da fare" commonly used in Italy?
    Yes, Mark, it's very common. Even "non c'è proprio niente da fare"; though it can be used with different nuances, too.
     

    cecil

    Senior Member
    USA American English
    Isp,

    >>We'd say, "I can't help it" in this context.

    "Non posso farne a meno"?

    cecil
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    cecil said:
    Isp,

    >>We'd say, "I can't help it" in this context.

    "Non posso farne a meno"?

    cecil
    Maybe I'm wrong, but to me that means more, "It's the least I can do." Thoughts from anyone else?
     

    ikester

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    Cecil said:
    "Non posso farne a meno"?
    lsp said:
    Maybe I'm wrong, but to me that means more, "It's the least I can do." Thoughts from anyone else?
    I can see where you'd get that idea, lsp, but it's used the way we use "I can't help it." Perhaps it would help to think of the translation as "I can do no less."

    ciao!
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    Ike, are you saying "non c'è proprio niente da fare" is not "I can't help it," but "non posso farne a meno" is? Then what is the best English equivalent for the former?

    Thanks, lsp
     

    cecil

    Senior Member
    USA American English
    Isp,

    >>"non c'è proprio niente da fare" is not "I can't help it"

    Isp,

    I know you didn't ask me for my opinion, but here it is anyway. "Non c'è proprio niente da fare" could mean "I can't help it" or it could mean "nobody can do anything about it." "Non posso farne a meno" at least makes the subject clear--"I."

    cecil
     

    ikester

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    lsp said:
    Ike, are you saying "non c'è proprio niente da fare" is not "I can't help it," but "non posso farne a meno" is? Then what is the best English equivalent for the former?

    Thanks, lsp
    Actually, both are fairly close to "I can't help it." (Though as Cecil points out, the latter makes "I" the subject. The former would be closer to "it can't be helped", I suppose.)

    But that wasn't the direction I meant to go... my point was that "non posso farne a meno" is not the same as our "it's the least I can do" -- the idomatic form that we use to shrug off a "thank you".

    ciao!
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    ikester said:
    Actually, both are fairly close to "I can't help it." (Though as Cecil points out, the latter makes "I" the subject. The former would be closer to "it can't be helped", I suppose.)

    But that wasn't the direction I meant to go... my point was that "non posso farne a meno" is not the same as our "it's the least I can do" -- the idomatic form that we use to shrug off a "thank you".

    ciao!
    I see. Thank you Ike. You have a real gift for explaining things clearly. So now my question is how to say "it's the least I can do"?
     

    leenico

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. english
    Silvia said:
    Non c'è niente da fare = there's nothing you can do about it

    What's wrong with my translation?
    Wouldn't it be "Non c'è niente puoi fare?" :confused:
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    Silvia said:
    Non c'è niente da fare = there's nothing you can do about it

    What's wrong with my translation?
    Nothing is "wrong" with it, Silvia. WHy can't the rest of us discuss our suggestions, too?
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    No one said you can't discuss other suggestions, in fact mine is among them. That's why I'm asking. I think I have a right to discuss, too.

    I can't help something and there's nothing you can do about it sound like two different things, or are they synonyms? And in case they are, I still think there's a difference among them, because the first is talking in first person, while the second is impersonal. It might be a nuance to some ears, but I will be grateful to anyone who can explain further.
     
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