Concerning a clause

Ground Zero

Senior Member
Korean-Korea
Reading my book, I have found the weird sentence:"I've done so much mental stuff I don't even want to think about it."

I think it refers to mental stuff but it seems unnecessary to me.

I suspect the includes an adjective clause and have learned that an adjective clause omits subject or object.(like.. Tom who is rude or she is the girl I told you )

So I think it should be omitted. I want to know why it is used in the sentence.

Can you explain this?
 
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  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    I don't know what you are referring to in terms of adjective clauses. The phrasal verb "to think about" requires an object, and that's why the "it" is necessary. The sentence would be incorrect without it.
     

    Ground Zero

    Senior Member
    Korean-Korea
    I don't know what you are referring to in terms of adjective clauses. The phrasal verb "to think about" requires an object, and that's why the "it" is necessary. The sentence would be incorrect without it.
    What I am referring to is like.. Tom who is rude or she is the girl I told you. I can't explain so well, and thank you
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It could be a relative clause (adjective clause) in that position, in which case 'it' would not be used, because the object of 'about' is the antecedent 'stuff'. So your analysis of that possibility is correct. But this is actually a different structure. It is a comparative clause licensed by 'so', as in:

    The cake was so big that I couldn't eat it all.
    The film lasted so long that I fell asleep.

    The comparative clause is complete: there's no missing part that corresponds to an antecedent, as there is in relative clauses. In both kinds the word 'that' can be omitted.

    I've done so much mental stuff (that) now my brain hurts.
    I've done so much mental stuff (that) I don't want to think about it.
     
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