Conditional (1)? Do I get a passport, I will go to London.

dn88

Senior Member
Polish
Hi again,

Somehow relating to my previous thread, I'd like to ask you whether stylistic inversion (used to form an emphatic sentence) in the 1st conditional sounds weird to your native-speaker ears (if it's possible of course). And what about the 2nd conditional?

"If I get a passport, I will go to London."

And the "inverse version" (more like "if" replaced with "do" :D, but I call it "stylistic inversion"):

"Do I get a passport, I will go to London."

Do they both mean the same thing to you?

Your advice is always welcome.

Thanks a lot,

dn88
 
  • tomandjerryfan

    Senior Member
    English (Canada)
    It actually makes very little sense to me. You might want to stick with "if," but if you want to use a "stylistic inversion" in a conditional, you could replace "if" with "should," but it might sound a bit pretentious in everyday speech.

    I can't think of any situation where you could replace "if" with "do."
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I think "do I" must always be the start of a question. However you could say "If I do get a passport" (emphasis on "do") meaning that if I fulfill my intention, or if I am granted a passport, etc., I will...

    I agree with T&JF's other points, too.
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thanks for your answers. So, in my way of reasoning, stylistic inversion is applicable solely to the 3rd conditional (neither to the 1st nor to the 2nd). Am I wrong?
     

    MonaArg

    Senior Member
    Argentina-Spanish
    Hi,
    Stylistic inversion can be used in Cond III , but also:
    1) Were you to do sth: Cond II
    Were you to touch them it would be like touching a plastic bag = If you touched them...
    2) Should you...: Cond I
    Should you decide to come, please let us know. = If you decide to come...

    Hope it helps.
    Bye,
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    2) Should you...: Cond I
    Should you decide to come, please let us know. = If you decide to come...
    To my mind it's not stylistic inversion, since "should" here acquires the role of "if". (It seems very much like the zero conditional)

    Anyway, thank you

    dn88
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    MonaArg

    Senior Member
    Argentina-Spanish
    Hi, dn88.
    Strictly speaking, it's a case of inversion, since the S + V pattern is inverted: Modal + S + Verb

    Anyway, you could also say:
    Should you decide to come, we will arrange to meet you ...
    That's why I said: Cond I

    But it mainly has to do with how "Should" can be used for the sake of emphasis.

    Bye,
     

    tomandjerryfan

    Senior Member
    English (Canada)
    I'm not sure if you're talking about the classic sense of stylistic inversion, but I think stylistic inversion with a conditional would actually be more like: "To London I will go, if I get a passport." It doesn't necessarily give emphasis to any part of the sentence, so if it's emphasis you're going for, I would stick with Matching_Mole's answer.
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I really appreciate your help. Finally, I've come to the conclusion that stylistic inversion can be used in the 3rd conditional, in the 2nd conditional with "was" or "were", however, it is not acceptable in the 1st conditional.

    Thank you very much,

    dn88
     

    MonaArg

    Senior Member
    Argentina-Spanish
    I think you've raised another point.

    Will you please tell us what you mean by "Stylistic"?

    a. Is it the inversion in the typical S + V order (Had I know, I would have done...)
    OR
    b. Is it the inversion in the sentence order: adv + v + subj (Here comes the Queen.)

    If it is a, then you're right: you cannot change the order for Cond 1.

    NO--> do they come tomorrow, I'll...

    Bye,
     

    gwengirl

    Member
    Spanish - Argentina
    Hi!

    I had a Language exam yesterday, and I didn't know how to solve this exercise. I was supposed to use inversion of order in the following sentence:

    If it could be found that the corporation requirements were not followed, the creditors might be able to pierce the corporate veil.

    How would you paraphrase this? :confused:

    I wrote: SHOULD IT BE FOUND that the..., the creditors would be able to...

    But I guess it's incorrect!! :( Thank you so much in advance.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    It sounds fine to me, gwengirl - better than the original version, actually:)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Ths sounds very much like an "if...then" sentence with the "then" understood.

    "If I get a passport, [then] I will go to London."

    It does not sound like any kind of inversion to me.
     
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