conference that I won a bursary <for>

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
The speaker uses "for" at the end of sentence. I understand it as "because": I wone a bursary because the overseas conference (Here, "for that" = because that). Am I on the right track?

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I am from Indonesia, but am now pursuing a PhD at a research institute in China. Before the outbreak happened, I applied for a visa to attend an overseas conference that I won a bursary for. But it’s impossible to get a visa now owing to office closures, so I won’t be able to get to the conference.

Source: Nature 21 FEBRUARY 2020
Your stories from the coronavirus outbreak
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It means that she won a bursary (I think that means some sort of financial award; it's not used in AE) for the conference - that is, to cover at least some of the expenses (travel, conference registration, room and meals while there) she will incur to attend the conference.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    That is, this bursary is simply used to cover the expense incurred by attending the conference?

    Thank you. :)
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    If "for" meant "because", then it constitutes a causal relationship. And the English expression should mean that the bursary is mostly confined to the expenditure for the conference.

    Let's see what other members would think about it.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "For" means the bursary is intended to be used to pay expenses at that conference. It applies to that conference. That money can't be used for anything else.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    "For" means the bursary is intended to be used to pay expenses at that conference. It applies to that conference. That money can't be used for anything else.
    :thumbsup: The expression "for" points to the specific purpose of the bursary, while a scholarship, as JS explained, is much broader than this.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Scholarship (as a sum of money) is indeed more common as a word, but the bursary/scholarship difference is mainly an AE/BE difference
    From the WRF Random House entry
    bur•sa•ry /ˈbɜrsəri/ n.[countable], pl. -ries. British Terms Brit. a college scholarship.
    Here's an example of scholarship=bursary:)
    To help members experience the difference the ICMA Annual Conference has made for so many others, ICMA offers conference assistance and scholarships.
    Scholarship recipients receive:
    Complimentary conference registration.
    Stipend to offset travel costs, in some cases.
    Source
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    That is informative.

    But talking about the use of "for" in the OP: Kentix's opinion is that the bursary is limited to the expense for the conference; while your opinion is including, but not limited to the expense for the conference.

    That is a big difference.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    That is informative.

    But talking about the use of "for" in the OP: Kentix's opinion is that the bursary is limited to the expense for the conference; while your opinion is including, but not limited to the expense for the conference.

    That is a big difference.
    The requirement (or "limitation") for accepting the bursary/scholarship is that you must go to the conference :eek:. If you go to the conference, you must pay the registration and you pay e.g., the train fare and for meals. Typically you will also be expected to write and submit a report. Whether the money actually comes from your bank account and not the bursary, doesn't really matter - it's all the same bank account, assuming you deposit the bursary in your account. The award may or may not cover all the expenses (so you'd have to pay some expenses yourself) or you may have a little left if you ate cheap meals :D
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    About the closing clause:

    Eating cheap meals doesn't save money? I always thought eating luxury meals makes your account have a little left.

    Which comes first? Bursary or conference? Just like egg or chicken.

    Here's a scenario: You're an excellent lab rat and published several papers and have won a scholarship or bursary; and now, you receive an invitation to an international conference. Here, bursay first, conference next.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    About the closing clause:

    Eating cheap meals doesn't save money? I always thought eating luxury meals makes your account have a little left.

    Which comes first? Bursary or conference? Just like egg or chicken.

    Here's a scenario: You're an excellent lab rat and published several papers and have won a scholarship or bursary; and now, you receive an invitation to an international conference. Here, bursay first, conference next.
    Arguing again? :D
    You apply for a scholarship/bursary for a specific conference. Of course the conference comes first. Does that help you understand the situation?
    or you may have a little left if you ate cheap meals :D
    If you had an allowance of $20 per meal but ate a cheaper ($15) meal, you would have some ($5) left over.
     

    billj

    Senior Member
    British English
    Before the outbreak happened, I applied for a visa to attend [an overseas conference that I won a bursary for ____].

    No, it has nothing to do with "because".

    "For" is called a stranded preposition here because it is not followed by the noun phrase that is understood as its complement, i.e. "an overseas conference".

    An alternative (and more formal) construction is to front the preposition along with its complement in a wh relative: an overseas conference for which I won a bursary.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    Arguing again? :D
    You apply for a scholarship/bursary for a specific conference. Of course the conference comes first. Does that help you understand the situation?
    Is that a geological discrepancy?

    The US is the world academic center. You have to fly across the Pacific Ocean from China to America, this travelling fare (China <--->US) would account for one-year allowance of a young Chinese scholar. So the strategy for a scholarship would be different.

    Of course an application for the bursary for a specific conference in the US is another question.


    Before the outbreak happened, I applied for a visa to attend [an overseas conference that I won a bursary for ____].

    No, it has nothing to do with "because".

    "For" is called a stranded preposition here because it is not followed by the noun phrase that is understood as its complement, i.e. "an overseas conference".

    An alternative (and more formal) construction is to front the preposition along with its complement in a wh relative: an overseas conference for which I won a bursary.
    OK. Thanks for the information.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Is that a geological discrepancy?
    Perhaps you mean geographical? :)

    The US is the world academic center. You have to fly across the Pacific Ocean from China to America, this travelling fare (China <--->US) would account for one-year allowance of a young Chinese scholar. So the strategy for a scholarship would be different.
    I am not sure what aspect of the topic this comment is directed at but I think you missed the post (#10) above explaining that some scholarships can be awarded specifically for travel to conferences.
    Of course an application for the bursary for a specific conference in the US is another question.
    The award for covering expenses for going to a conference can be called a scholarship or, mainly in BE, a bursary.
     
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