Confused on Accusative / Objective/Nominative Cases

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chrislols

Member
english
Γεία σας.

I was wondering if anyone could help me with a problem I am currently having while learning Greek.

In my book it's starting to teach me how you change Article, and the ending of nouns based on their gender.

While I'm understanding, for example : the masculine nouns and how their article changes from 'o' to 'τον΄ και ΄τους' and you drop the 'ς' or change it to a 'ους' in an Accusative form.

And I also understand the article / ending changes for feminine and neuter nouns, in the accusative. It brings me to the objective case where you use 'στον, στη(ν), στο' and of course the ending changes.

What I'm confused on is how do I tell whether or not I'm speaking in the accusative, or the objective case.

I don't know whether I would say:

"Τον άνθρωπο' or 'στον άνθρωπο'

The same going for the feminine and neuter nouns.

While I apologize for the long post, if anyone could help explain the differences in accusative and objective cases, and any tips, I'd greatly appreciate it. Επειδή, μαθαίνω Ελληνικά μόνο για ενα χρόνο :p

Σας ευχαριστώ
 
Last edited:
  • ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Hey there!
    Are you sure your book talks about a separate case called "objective"? You see, there isn't one. In modern Greek we have 4 cases
    Nominative (ο άνθρωπος - οι άνθρωποι)
    Genitive (του άνθρωπου - των ανθρώπων)
    Accusative (τον άνθρωπο - τους ανθρώπους)
    Vocative (άνθρωπε - άνθρωποι)

    Accusative is the case we use for object nine times out of ten . Therefore, it is also called "objective case" (see definition 4 for the adjective here). In other words, a case that is used to express the object (and a few other things at times) can be also called the "objective case".
     

    chrislols

    Member
    english
    Hey there!
    Are you sure your book talks about a separate case called "objective"? You see, there isn't one. In modern Greek we have 4 cases
    Nominative (ο άνθρωπος - οι άνθρωποι)
    Genitive (του άνθρωπου - των ανθρώπων)
    Accusative (τον άνθρωπο - τους ανθρώπους)
    Vocative (άνθρωπε - άνθρωποι)

    Accusative is the case we use for object nine times out of ten . Therefore, it is also called "objective case" (see definition 4 for the adjective here). In other words, a case that is used to express the object (and a few other things at times) can be also called the "objective case".
    Oh, okay. I re-read it, and I confused my self.

    I met to say the Nominative and the Accusative cases.

    So than my problem is, is I don't understand what it means to 'express the object', and when would I be using 'στον, στη(ν), και στο'
     
    Last edited:

    orthophron

    Senior Member
    Greek
    So than my problem is, is I don't understand what it means to 'express the object', and when would I be using 'στον, στη(ν), και στο'
    Hi! στον, στην etc are prepositional articles composed of the preposition "σε" (= to, in) + the article.

    When to use τον/την/το or στον/στην/στο
    It all depends on the verb. For instance, in English you say: "I met the girl", but "I talked to the girl". Similarly in Greek we say "συνάντησα το κορίτσι", but "μίλησα στο κορίτσι".

    "I" is the subject of the verb, while "the girl" is the object. As you 'll soon find out, the object is mostly in accusative but sometimes in genitive.
     

    tzesyneas

    Member
    greek
    στον usually means a movement towards a place, a person, an object etc. and in modern greek it means the location where a movement takes place. for example πηγαίνω στο γιατρό(i am going to the doctor), or είμαι στο γιατρό(i am at the doctor's)
    on the other hand, τον answers to whom the action of the verb goes. eg είδα τον γιατρό(i saw the doctor) .
    here's a list of examples:
    - Δίνω τον φάκελο. (I give the file)
    - Δίνω στο δάσκαλο. (I give to the teacher)
    - Δίνω το φάκελο στο δάσκαλο. (I give the file to the teacher)
    - Πηγαίνω στο σχολείο. (I go to school)
    - Κάθομαι στην καρέκλα. ( I'm sitting at a chair)
     
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