conjecture and conjectures

opinion_ow

Member
Ukraine - Russian, Ukrainian
conjecture and conjectures <-----Topic added to post by moderator (Florentia52)----->

Hi! How to use these two correctly? Is there any difference between them?
 
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  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Could you give sentences that include the word?

    Conjecture can be a noun or a verb.
     

    opinion_ow

    Member
    Ukraine - Russian, Ukrainian
    Could you give sentences that include the word?

    Conjecture can be a noun or a verb.
    Both are nouns.
    For example, "His conclusion is formed on the basis of incomplete information, i.e., conjecture."
    "The jury was influenced by the solicitor`s conjectures."

    Conjecture is the mass noun, and conjectures might be plural of the countable noun.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Countable and uncountable are not absolute attributes - many nouns can be both countable and uncountable depending on the context. If the vast majority of the uncountable nouns are adjectivally specified, this makes the noun countable.

    "Wine (uncountable) is a wonderful drink, but French wines (countable as it has been specified) are perhaps the best."

    An uncountable noun represents (all of) a homogeneous group/set/class.

    There are very few purely uncountable nouns (advice, goods, jewellery, and guidance are the only examples I can think of) but all countable nouns can be used in an uncountable manner.

    Normally, we would think of "knife" as being only countable, but in "The pirates cut the bags open by knife." "knife" is uncountable. We know it is uncountable because all singular, countable nouns must be qualified by a determiner (a/an, the, his, this, that, any, etc.) and "by knife" has no determiner.
     

    opinion_ow

    Member
    Ukraine - Russian, Ukrainian
    Countable and uncountable are not absolute attributes - many nouns can be both countable and uncountable depending on the context. If the vast majority of the uncountable nouns are adjectivally specified, this makes the noun countable.

    "Wine (uncountable) is a wonderful drink, but French wines (countable as it has been specified) are perhaps the best."

    An uncountable noun represents (all of) a homogeneous group/set/class.

    There are very few purely uncountable nouns (advice, goods, jewellery, and guidance are the only examples I can think of) but all countable nouns can be used in an uncountable manner.

    Normally, we would think of "knife" as being only countable, but in "The pirates cut the bags open by knife." "knife" is uncountable. We know it is uncountable because all singular, countable nouns must be qualified by a determiner (a/an, the, his, this, that, any, etc.) and "by knife" has no determiner.
    Thank you for such an explicit answer! It helps a lot.
     
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