connecting two clauses in "It's advised that A and that B"

JBPARK

Senior Member
According to “Living Rules", it is advised that you have clean water bottles, toilet articles and towels ready, and that you wash hands and feet before entering the dining facility and brush teeth after each meal."

HI,

Regarding the above sentence I wrote, I am wondering whether it's OK to have the underlined part as it is, or whether I should tweak it by adding or subtracting words because in its current form, it's not grammatical.

Thanks for your expertise in advance.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Your sentence looks good to me, JB Park. You might want to add one word to the underlined part: ..., and that you wash your hands and feet before...
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The text is grammatical and the bald style is appropriate for instructions.
    However, it is not clear from the phrasing whether the advice originates from 'Living Rules', or is being quoted by 'Living Rules' from some other source.
     
    Last edited:

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    According to “Living Rules", it is advised that you have clean water bottles, toilet articles and towels ready, and that you wash hands and feet before entering the dining facility and brush teeth after each meal."
    It's all clear by me. It doesn't need tweaking.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I would add your as shown. It is not entirely necessary but, without them, your example is little impersonal.

    and that you wash your hands and feet before entering the dining facility and brush your teeth after each meal."
     

    JBPARK

    Senior Member
    Well, I don't mind it coming off a bit impersonal since it's talking about a certain kind of "rule".

    Without them, would it sound awkward, aside from being impersonal?

    "...and that you wash hands and feet before entering the dining facility and brush teeth after each meal."
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    To be honest, I think both yours are needed. Although understandable without them, there is just something a little strange about the sentence.

     
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