Connie flung an emerald-green shawl over her window-sill

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(page 353, chapter 16) by Lawrence (planetebook,here):
(background:Connie was staying with Mellors for the last night before she went to Venice, and Hilda had to drive her to there. And in a previous paragraph, Connie had arranged with Mellors that if everything promised well for their night together, she would hang a green shawl out of the window. If there were frustration, a red one.)

And she(Hilda) consented to drive to Mansfield, both of them, to dinner, to bring Connie back to the lane-end after dark, and to fetch her from the lane-end the next morning, herself sleeping in Mansfield, only half an hour away, good going.
But she was furious. She stored it up against her sister, this balk in her plans.
Connie flung an emerald-green shawl over her window-sill.

I feel the sentence to be: Connie tied(=flung) an emerald-green shawl (around a window bar) over her windowsill.
Is that right please?
Thank you in advance
 
Last edited:
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It is the meaning below:

    fling /flɪŋ/ v., flung/flʌŋ/ fling•ing, n.
    v. [~ + object]
    1. to throw or cast with force, violence, or without care: flung the dishes to the floor.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    I now believe flung here doesn't mean tied, even though Connie had planned to hang a shawl.
    And I guess you are careless this time: It's Hilda what was angry, rather than Connie:D.
    Maybe the shawl is heavy and big.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I now believe flung here doesn't mean tied, even though Connie had planned to hang a shawl.
    And I guess you are careless this time: It's Hilda what was angry, rather than Connie:D.
    Maybe the shawl is heavy and big.
    I don't always read all the text in your posts:) I read the last sentence and explained the meaing of flung, because you had misinterpreted it, and its meaning doesn't change depending on the context. Flung was still a rash/impetuous action, no matter who was furious!
     
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