connotative/ denotative

charlie2

Senior Member
Hello, everyone,
Would anyone be kind enough to explain to me the meaning of the above words, if possible with examples?
I have looked up the dictionary, but still can't get it.
The passage in which these words are found is about the words we have lost and gained with time.
"The words we've lost tend to be connotative and the ones we've gained tend to be denotative......" It looks oral because the writer is quoting what a playwright said on the subject.
Thank you.
 
  • mylam

    Senior Member
    United States English
    charlie2 said:
    Hello, everyone,
    Would anyone be kind enough to explain to me the meaning of the above words, if possible with examples?
    I have looked up the dictionary, but still can't get it.
    The passage in which these words are found is about the words we have lost and gained with time.
    "The words we've lost tend to be connotative and the ones we've gained tend to be denotative......" It looks oral because the writer is quoting what a playwright said on the subject.
    Thank you.

    Hi Charlie! Here's my understanding:

    "Connotative" has the same root as "connotation", the implied meanings that words have, that are understood by native speakers but not always written down in definitions. For example, "angry" and "irate" are very close in meaning, but to me "irate" signals a loss of self-control that isn't implied by "angry". An example of a synonym that has been nearly lost is "wroth".

    "Denotative" words are specific in meaning, like names of objects, and are lacking the connotative overtones. "CD player" is a new term, and is denotative because it's a name, with no negative or positive overtones.
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    charlie2 said:
    Hello, everyone,
    Would anyone be kind enough to explain to me the meaning of the above words, if possible with examples?
    I have looked up the dictionary, but still can't get it.
    The passage in which these words are found is about the words we have lost and gained with time.
    "The words we've lost tend to be connotative and the ones we've gained tend to be denotative......" It looks oral because the writer is quoting what a playwright said on the subject.
    Thank you.
    Hi charlie;
    I guess in simple terms.....

    Denoted is literally what a symbol/word is (ie: you see a rose, you know it's a rose, a flower).
    Connoted is what it implies, sort of. Like you see a rose, you think of romance, love.

    te gato;)
     

    charlie2

    Senior Member
    Thank you, mylam. That's clear and quick! I am getting more than I expect.
    I just looked up "wroth" (before it is lost :) ) in my dictionary. It says it is "old-fashioned"!
    Edit: Sorry, I didn't see your post,Te gato. Thank you. That's succinct.
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    charlie2 said:
    Thank you, mylam. That's clear and quick! I am getting more than I expect.
    I just looked up "wroth" (before it is lost :) ) in my dictionary. It says it is "old-fashioned"!
    Edit: Sorry, I didn't see your post,Te gato. Thank you. That's succinct.
    charlie2;
    That is ok....
    you are welcome

    te gato;)
     
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