consolatio - con il solo

Erszebet

Member
Czech
Hi,
I am translating a book from Italian, where the author incidentally stops at the word "consolatio", and claims it to originate from the "con il solo": to be with someone who is alone. I suppose this is just an imaginative etymology, but am not able to verify it.
Can somebody help me?
Thanks!
E.
 
  • bearded

    Senior Member
    Hi

    I suppose this is just an imaginative etymology, :tick:
    According to some etymologic dictionaries, consolatio is derived from the deponent verb consolari (composed by con<cum (intensifier) and solari (to comfort) from solus/sollus (the adjective meant 'whole, complete' besides 'alone'), so the original meaning should be ''making someone complete again (after a loss)'' > 'comforting'.

    In Italian, 'solo' means alone, and I think that the author of the book was influenced by his mother tongue - and indicated a folk etymology.
    I hope that etymologists better than myself will confirm the above.
     
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    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    Greetings all—and to Erszebet, a hearty welcome to the Latin forum.

    Barbatus noster (# 2) is quite right, there is no connexion, so yes, Erszebet's Italian author's idea is a folk-etymology. OLD (s.v. solus) declares '[prob. cognate with se]', and I am tempted to try to devise a connexion with Greek ὅλος, but this (possibly outrageous) notion would have to be tempered in the fire of the EHL Forum's experts.

    Σ
     

    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    saluete de nouo

    A propos bearded's # 4: this is I believe indeed established philological orthodoxy. Oddly enough it occurred to me already in my teens when I was only a year or two into learning Greek.

    Σ

    Edited afterthought: German heil as well.
     

    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Greek holos is cognate with Latin salvus, Sanskrit sarva-, and other forms, with IE *s- becoming Greek h-. English whole, hale, heal etc are not cognate with these, but reflect an IE *k- becoming Germanic h-.
     
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    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    According to some etymologic dictionaries, consolatio is derived from the deponent verb consolari (composed by con<cum (intensifier) and solari (to comfort) from solus/sollus (the adjective meant 'whole, complete' besides 'alone'), so the original meaning should be ''making someone complete again (after a loss)'' > 'comforting'.
    sōlārī "to comfort" is not directly dervied from sōlus "alone", which is a whole ( :) ) different word from sollus "whole". The latter is related to salvus "whole, healthy" more or less like the two English translations are related to each other. sōlārī < *sōlha- "mercy, comfort" is probably related to sollus < *solha-n-os, being just a lengthened ablaut gradation of the latter, though I don't see a good way to connect the two semantically. It's reflected by AGr. as ἱλάσκομαι, similarly denominal (as Latin a-verbs normally are) to ἵλαος. sōlus might ultimately be of the same provenance as sollus in the proto-language, via the metonymy "whole" > "one" > "alone", but formed differently in any case.
     
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    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    Please, check my guess instead of Ottorino Piangiani:
    Solor, aris, atus sum, ari is related to sŏlum, i: (IT) base, sostegno, supporto ⇒ sostenere, supportare.
    (fig.) sostegno morale ⇒ confortare.
    Etimologia : consolare;
    Temo che un dizionario etimologico di italiano vecchio di 110 anni sia abbastanza inutile per verificare anche l'etimologia delle parole italiane - e del tutto inutile nel caso del latino. Per quest'ultimo, troverai più utile De Vaan 2008 e le altre fonti elencate nella prima pagina della bibliografia (a cui mi sono collegato), come Walde & Hoffmann. Il verbo formato dalla base di *sol- "base, suolo, luogo" (con parole imparentate come Ru. seló "villaggio", Ted. Saal "sala") e forse solēre "avere l'abitudine": cf. una relazione simile tra habitāre e habitus.

    Inoltre considero improbabile un tale cambiamento di significato come "basarsi" > "confortare, alleviare", tanto meno in greco e latino nello stesso tempo.
     
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