Constructions that sound weird when translating from English

matheusba

New Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hello everyone,

I was wondering if maybe you could help me with something.

I have been thinking about some constructions in English that sound weird when translated into Portuguese, and would like to know if you can think of others so to help me.

The one I have come across before, and have been able to find some examples, is the following:
- The room was dirty, so John swept it clean. / A sala estava suja, então João a varreu limpa.
- The table was wet, so Mary wiped it dry. / A mesa estava molhada, então Maria a esfregou seca.

As you can see, it is not a matter of idiomatic expression, but the sentence in bold in English, when translated into Portuguese pose a doubt to some Portuguese speakers (especially if they lack knowledge of English).

Can you think of other constructions, different from the one above, that pose similar problems?

Thanks in advance.
 
  • pfaa09

    Senior Member
    Portugal - Portuguese
    Eu faço imensas traduções, pois adoro fazer/traduzir legendas de inglês para português (PT-PT)
    e cruzo-me com frases, expressões e sentenças desses género "all the time"
    O que há a fazer é traduzir para o nosso português da forma que nós entendemos.
    O inglês está recheado de exemplos desses que assinala.

    "The room was dirty, so John swept it clean"
    A sala/O quarto/estava suja/o, então o John varreu-a.
    O Clean aqui não precisa de tradução a meu ver, se varremos estamos a limpar, logo pode ser omitido.

    "The table was wet, so Mary wiped it dry"
    A mesa estava molhada, então a Mary secou-a.

    Neste caso, o dry serve para nos dizer que o que a Mary vai fazer é isso mesmo, secar o molhado.
    logo basta dizer secar... com o quê é um detalhe... pode ser um pano, um papel, etc...
    O mais importante é dizer que está a secar a mesa.

    Esta é apenas a minha opinião, aguardemos por mais ajudas
    Cumps
     

    matheusba

    New Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Eu faço imensas traduções, pois adoro fazer/traduzir legendas de inglês para português (PT-PT)
    e cruzo-me com frases, expressões e sentenças desses género "all the time"
    O que há a fazer é traduzir para o nosso português da forma que nós entendemos.
    O inglês está recheado de exemplos desses que assinala.

    "The room was dirty, so John swept it clean"
    A sala/O quarto/estava suja/o, então o John varreu-a.
    O Clean aqui não precisa de tradução a meu ver, se varremos estamos a limpar, logo pode ser omitido.

    "The table was wet, so Mary wiped it dry"
    A mesa estava molhada, então a Mary secou-a.

    Neste caso, o dry serve para nos dizer que o que a Mary vai fazer é isso mesmo, secar o molhado.
    logo basta dizer secar... com o quê é um detalhe... pode ser um pano, um papel, etc...
    O mais importante é dizer que está a secar a mesa.

    Esta é apenas a minha opinião, aguardemos por mais ajudas
    Cumps
    Yes, pfaa09, I understand what you're saying that sometimes you can leave the last word out and the meaning will be conveyed perfectly, sometimes. And that is indeed a very clever solution for problems with the mentioned structure.

    The thing I am most interested in finding here, and that's why I have come here for help, mainly, are other examples of constructions that in English are perfectly OK, but when translated (especially literal translations) into Portuguese, they sound weird, even incomprehensible sometimes, to people who don't speak English.
     

    pfaa09

    Senior Member
    Portugal - Portuguese
    "Those dishes won't do themselves" Aqueles pratos não se vão fazer a eles mesmos ou sozinhos.
    Na verdade eles não se vão lavar sozinhos.

     
    Last edited:

    guihenning

    Senior Member
    Português do Brasil
    Phrasal verbs literally translated + Portuguese don't get along…
    Usually they're the problem, among other peculiarities in both sides. Instead of 'wipe clean' only 'to wipe' is enough for us. We don't do dishes — only in the factories where they're made — but we wash dishes to make them clean. Go up, mash it down, ask around, break up among other problematic literal translations.
     

    pfaa09

    Senior Member
    Portugal - Portuguese
    matheusba said:
    The thing I am most interested in finding here, and that's why I have come here for help, mainly, are other examples of constructions that in English are perfectly OK, but when translated (especially literal translations) into Portuguese, they sound weird, even incomprehensible sometimes, to people who don't speak English.
    Brian asked Judy out to dinner and a movie.
    Our car broke down at the side of the highway in the snowstorm.
    See these beautiful paper cranes? (birds)
    Do you and your sister get along?
    Enough small talk. Let's get down to business.
    You should keep at your studies.
    The trip to Vegas didn't pan out.
    Jennifer passed on the invitation to join us for dinner.

    Source/fonte: ENGLISH PAGE - Phrasal Verb Dictionary

    We were the largest packing plant in Texas. "packing plant" (empacotadora de carne)
    Angie will duck behind the desk. "duck" (neste caso, abaixar-se subitamente)
     
    Last edited:

    Joca

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    I guess I would translate it this way:

    "The room was dirty, so John swept it clean" >>> O quarto estava sujo, então/daí/mas John (o) varreu até ficar limpo.

    "The table was wet, so Mary wiped it dry" >>> A mesa estava molhada, então/daí/mas Mary (a) esfregou até ficar seca.

    I find English idioms to be a challenge rather than a problem. You can almost always find a way to put them into Portuguese, but surely you will often need more words.
     

    Tony100000

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    I guess I would translate it this way:

    "The room was dirty, so John swept it clean" >>> O quarto estava sujo, então/daí/mas John (o) varreu até ficar limpo.

    "The table was wet, so Mary wiped it dry" >>> A mesa estava molhada, então/daí/mas Mary (a) esfregou até ficar seca.

    I find English idioms to be a challenge rather than a problem. You can almost always find a way to put them into Portuguese, but surely you will often need more words.
    Esses exemplos traduzidos, de facto, indicam uma tradução mais literal dos termos. Quando traduzo, também tento ir por esses meios, mas, na realidade, quando passamos da escrita para a fala, a situação é outra. Ao dizermos apenas "varrer", "limpar", "esfregar", parte-se do pressuposto que é até algo ficar limpo na totalidade, salvo alguma excepção previamente dita.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top