contemplating one of his fellow-men, <and> that man his employer.

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The narrator recalls his adolescence.
He, his great aunt and friends came to Ham's office to meet Mr. Micawber who is the clerk for local lawyer Uriah Hip.
Uriah Hip is the partner of Mr. Wickfield, who is very sick now, whose only daughter Agnes is narrator's old friend.
Now Mr. Micawber is about to disclose Uriah having done evil deeds.

Chapter 52 I ASSIST AT AN EXPLOSION
.................................
'Don't wait, Micawber,' said Uriah.
Mr. Micawber, with his hand upon the ruler in his breast, stood erect before the door, most unmistakably contemplating one of his fellow-men, and that man his employer.
'What are you waiting for?' said Uriah. 'Micawber! did you hear me tell you not to wait?'
[David Copperfield by Charles Dickens]
I think "one of his fellow-men" is in apposition to "that man his employer."
So I was wondering what role "and" plays here.
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Glenfarclas, for your so very helpful answer. :)
    Then I'd like to know if "one of his fellow-mean" is one and "that man" is another.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Glasguensis, for your message. :)
    I'd like to know if "one of his fellow-mean" is a different person from "that man his employer."
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    No. Another way of writing this would be
    ...one of his fellow-men : in fact his employer.

    "His employer" is a clarification of which one of his fellow men he was looking at.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top