continue monitoring intensively for all adverse effects

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LQZ

Senior Member
Mandarin
Dr. Frieden said that the likelihood of an increased risk of the syndrome this time was “vanishingly remote,” but that the disease centers would continue monitoring intensively for all adverse effects.---taken from The New York Times
Dear all,

Online Longman Dictionary says that monitor is a transtive, so I don't think there is no need to use for after monitor. I would reword it this way:

..., but that the disease centers would continue monitoring intensively all adverse effects.

Am I right? Looking forward to your help. Thanks.

LQZ
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Monitor the patient's adverse effects to the medicine. That's your version. The patient is having adverse effects and you want them monitored.

    Monitor the patient for adverse effects to the medicine. That's Dr. Frieden's approach. He's given the patient medicine and he's concerned that there may be adverse effects. He wants the patient monitored to see if that happens (it may not).
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    No... for means for. :) As in, "I'm checking my pockets for money." If I needed a phrase to substitute for "for" I would say: "I'm checking my pockets for [to see if there is any] money.

    "...disease centers would continue monitoring intensively for [to see if there were any] adverse effects." (Although they're promising to monitor for ALL adverse effects, but you get the idea.)

    This may not be perfect substitution, but it will get you closer than you were.
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Not really intransitive, I think (though I could be wrong). They are monitoring people to see if adverse effects develop. The object of "monitor" is understood.
     
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