continued to cook / cooking

ramelot80

Senior Member
Español Spanish
Hi there!

Could some one help me to understand the difference between " continued to cook / continued cooking?

I was cooking lunch when I heard the news. (and I continued to cook lunch afterwards). Why not "contiuned cooking afterwards?

Many thanks for your help.
 
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  • fade07

    Member
    English-United States
    "Continued to cook" and "continued cooking" mean the same thing. There's no difference.
     

    donbeto

    Senior Member
    Eng (Canada)
    Hi there!

    Could some one help me to undersatand the difference between " continued to cook / continued cooking?

    I was cooking lunch when I heard the news. (and <I> continued to cook <lunch> afterwards):tick:. Why not "contiuned cooking afterwards?

    Many thanks for your help.
    These <words> are optional. Both meanings are the same, but "to cook" to me sounds better.
     

    gavota

    Member
    eNGLISH
    Dear Ramelot, excellent question. There is indeed a difference, though it is extremely subtle. I am one who believes no two words (in any language) or phrases mean exactly the same thing. There's always a shade of difference, otherwise, humans would not have required and developed the alternate. In this case, "continued to cook" puts a slight emphasis on the fact of continuation. While "continued cooking" tips the weight very slightly toward the act of cooking, i.e., the action, as is always the case with a participle ("ing" form of the verb). Again, great question!
     

    Magmod

    Banned
    England English
    Yes I agree with gavota
    Seguir and continuar + the gerund can be used to emphasize the notion that an action has not yet been completed:
    I think it is the same difference in Spanish between:
    Seguí a cocinar comida luego = I continued to cook lunch afterwards , I kept on cooking lunch afterwards
    Continué cocinando almuerzo luego = I continued cooking lunch afterwards
    seguir haciendo algo = to go on doing sth, keep on doing sth
    sigue lloviendo = it's still raining
     
    Last edited:

    Magmod

    Banned
    England English
    Yes I agree with gavota
    Seguir and continuar + the gerund can be used to emphasize the notion that an action has not yet been completed:
    I think it is the same difference in Spanish between:
    Seguí a cocinar comida luego = I continued to cook lunch afterwards
    Continué cocinando almuerzo luego = I continued cooking lunch afterwards, I kept on cooking lunch afterwards

    seguir haciendo algo = to go on doing sth, keep on doing sth
    sigue lloviendo = it's still raining
     

    onthebass

    Senior Member
    United States
    "Continued to cook" and "continued cooking" mean the same thing. There's no difference.
    I agree with fade07, there is no discernable difference really worth worrying about. What I would think about most is the construction and effect of the sentence.

    When you say "I heard the news," that usually implies that it is news that is affecting you personally, e.g., someone died, someone is having a baby, World War III has begun. You want to include what you did in the meantime to show that you stopped cooking.

    I was cooking lunch when I heard the news. I froze for a moment, and then continued cooking.
    I was cooking lunch when I heard the news. I smiled to myself, and then continued to cook.
    I was cooking lunch when I heard the news. I sat for a while, and then continued to cook.


    If you want to imply that you were unfazed by news, like WWIII had begun, then you could say:

    I was cooking lunch when I heard the news... I continued to cook.
     

    Magmod

    Banned
    England English

    continue to do sth, esp in an obstinate and determined way and in spite of opposition, argument or failure

    continue doing sth in spite of difficulties


    Therefore if you were unfazed by the news, you should say
    I was cooking lunch when I heard the news... I continued cooking.
     

    onthebass

    Senior Member
    United States
    I was thinking about it. I think it has more to do with style. Normally in written prose you don't want to repeat the same word or phrase too closely together, unless it is for effect.

    Really there is no difference between "continue to cook" and "continue cooking". It is "continue" that gives the sentence its sense of continuity or "notion that an action has not yet been completed."
     

    ramelot80

    Senior Member
    Español Spanish
    Dear Ramelot, excellent question. There is indeed a difference, though it is extremely subtle. I am one who believes no two words (in any language) or phrases mean exactly the same thing. There's always a shade of difference, otherwise, humans would not have required and developed the alternate. In this case, "continued to cook" puts a slight emphasis on the fact of continuation. While "continued cooking" tips the weight very slightly toward the act of cooking, i.e., the action, as is always the case with a participle ("ing" form of the verb). Again, great question!
    Dear Gavota,
    Brilliant replay too!
    I definitely think it has something to do with the emphasis as you have explained. Altough, there is not much difference between these two forms, "verb+to+inf" may help us to stress the action of cooking. At least, I understand it that way.

    Thank everybody for your useful comments.
     

    duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Just a question. Is it normal in Br.Eng to say 'cooking' when talking about lunch? I would go with 'making lunch' (or even 'fixing'...)
     

    inib

    Senior Member
    British English
    Just a question. Is it normal in Br.Eng to say 'cooking' when talking about lunch? I would go with 'making lunch' (or even 'fixing'...)
    If it involves cooking (even minimal), yes, perfectly normal. Not, obviously, if we are just making a sandwich. "Make" and "prepare" are also normal. "Fix" sounds to me as if something went wrong with the first attempt!
     

    duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    In the U.S., "fixing" is a colloquial way of saying either cooking or preparing.
    Thanks! I was afraid inib would say 'only in Chicago'. My friends fix breakfast(s) and lunch(es). It's pretty common. (not counting 'turkey with all the fixins/fixin's'...')
     

    inib

    Senior Member
    British English
    ...not counting 'turkey with all the fixins/fixin's'...')
    "...with all the trimmings" in my neck of the woods. Actually I've heard "fix lunch" many a time from Americans, so I wasn't surprised by it, but it always seems slightly comical to me.
     

    duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    "...with all the trimmings" in my neck of the woods. Actually I've heard "fix lunch" many a time from Americans, so I wasn't surprised by it, but it always seems slightly comical to me.
    Told'ya. You should visit Chicago.
     
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