Contorted baseball verb forms [sports: verbs]

cuchuflete

Senior Member
EEUU-inglés
If you have played the game, watched it, listened to it on radio, or read about it,
you will be comfortable with these baseball verbs:

grounded out - from to ground out
flied out - from to fly out
fouled out - from to foul out

All of these are shortened forms derived from, "the batter was out as a result of hitting a gound/fly/foul ball". Of course nobody would ever use such a pretentious long form to describe a game.

If you don't know anything, or just very little, about baseball, would you understand these terms? Are they used for anything other than baseball? Are there other, similar verb forms for other games?
 
  • KenInPDX

    Senior Member
    US English
    If you knew little or nothing about baseball, I don't think you would understand these terms. Most people born and raised in the US probably have at least heard them at some point in their life, but perhaps not everyone.

    I can't think of any situation outside of baseball in which you would use them. People use sports analogies a lot in the US, but I don't think these particular terms would be likely to be used outside of a baseball game.

    The term "foul up" is used to mean to make a mistake or mess up something.

    In basketball, you can also "foul out" - slightly different meaning than baseball (to be disqualified from playing in the remainder of a game for committing too many fouls, or rules violations).

    I can't think of any other analagous sports-related verb forms
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I'm sure there are (probably) some weird'n'wonderful verb terms in the 'noble game' of cricket, Cuchie. Unfortunately I'm about as interested in that as I am in baseball, which is to say not one whit. Perhaps, though, there are terms such as silly-mid-leg-onned, out-fielded, sixed ... in cricket, I mean.

    OOH! just remembered: there's a term in rugby union (or rugby league, or both): up-and-under. So that would no doubt produce up-and-undering, etc. [No, I haven't made this up.]
     
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    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    If you have played the game, watched it, listened to it on radio, or read about it,
    you will be comfortable with these baseball verbs:

    grounded out - from to ground out
    flied out - from to fly out
    fouled out - from to foul out

    All of these are shortened forms derived from, "the batter was out as a result of hitting a gound/fly/foul ball". Of course nobody would ever use such a pretentious long form to describe a game.

    If you don't know anything, or just very little, about baseball, would you understand these terms? Are they used for anything other than baseball? Are there other, similar verb forms for other games?
    I'm a bit reluctant to suggest verbs from other sports. The list might be endless. :)

    Many such verbs would be nonsense except when linked directly to a sport. Two examples from tennis:

    lob someone (hit a lob that is a winner)
    pass someone (hit a passing shot that is a winner)

    However, so far "flied" seems to be the clear winner as an example of strange sports verbs!

    Gaer
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Thanks for sending me out after that foul ball, Prof. U.E. I found this in left field:

    "
    UK Police abbreviation meaning 'Load Of Bollocks' which can be used in front of the public without causing offence.
    "Cancel that back up, this pub fight is an LOB"


    And power hitter Ewie has just lined out to center!
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    balk a run in
    toe the rubber

    But now we are dealing with real verbs, albeit with specialized jargon meanings.

    How about "whiffed"?

    Scott Brosius struck out on a 95 m.p.h. fastball in the second, and Joe Girardi whiffed on a curveball; Tino Martinez, Davis and Ledee all whiffed in the fifth inning, the first of three innings in which the Boston pitcher struck out the side.

    Ah, there's another weird one, "struck out on".
     
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    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    Interesting topic. Some other baseball verbs I can think of that might not make sense to the average foreigner:

    He bunted the ball to third.
    He pulled/pushed a bunt.
    He roped one/hit a rope to left-center. (Derived from the concept that a hard-hit ball has the trajectory of a frozen rope..that is, very straight instead of falling back to Earth)
     

    MrYeahbut

    Senior Member
    USA- English
    He lined out to third. (hard hit ball)
    Punched him out on a slider. (struck him out)
    He nubbed one down the first base line. ( the ball dribbled toward first)
     

    ewhite

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    More baseball verbs:

    To single: to hit a ball well enough that you may run to first base.

    To double: as above, but run to second base.

    To triple: as above yet again, but to third base.

    To homer: To hit a home run; a hit that allows the batter to touch all four bases.
     
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