contract killing

Xander2024

Senior Member
Russian
Hello everyone,

I've got a question that's been weighing on my mind for a very long time now. I would like one or other of our native speakers to help me and I'll do my best to describe the situation:

A contract killing. It takes at least three: the victim, the killer and (???). What do you call the one who pays for the killing to be done? The customer?

One more question on the same subject: what verb do you use to describe the following act:
Mr. A: Here is ten grand, Mr B. I want Mr. Smith dead by tomorrow.
Mr. B. OK, he is as good as dead.

What has Mr A just done?

Thank you so much.
 
Last edited:
  • catlady60

    Senior Member
    English-US (New York City)
    The person who hires a killer is technically commiting the crime of solicitation of murder, the onewho's putting a hit out on the victim. The guy who carries out the contract killing is also known as the hit man, or a hit squad if it's a group who's hired to do the killing.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    That sentence doesn't sound right. If we don't know the contractor for the active voice, we can say "There is a contract out on Smith."

    It's possible for it to be "known on the street" that "someone" has "put out a contract" on Smith, but not who that person's name. For most people, it would be better not to know.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    In general, the person who performs the service is the contractor. A hired killer is sometimes called a "contract killer". The one who pays the contractor is the "employer" in more general usage, or (from the contractor's point of view) the client.

    In this specific situation, I guess we have the victim, the contract killer, and... hmm. I see your problem. I can't think of any one-word answer. The one who put out the contract, I guess.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Do you mean to say the hitman and the contractor are one and the same person?
    Yes, I do. In my experience as a translator, the contractor is always the one who performs the service, not the one who pays for the service. I know it's counter-intuitive. :(
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    For me, the use of "client" or "employer" depends on the point of view of the sentence. For complete clarity, I would say "the person who ordered the hit" or "the person who put out the contract".

    Should the situation arise, that is. :rolleyes:
     
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