Contracted Forms in British Magazines/Newspapers

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Christhiane

Senior Member
English
I have an exam in translation tomorrow, and I've completely forgotten to ask a very important question, namely: To what extent do British newspapers and magazines use contracted forms?

Since all the texts previously used in exams is in that style, I'm pretty sure we're getting one tomorrow.
 
  • MissFit

    Senior Member
    I can't answer the question regarding British newspapers, but I know that American newspapers use contractions frequently, primarily because they save space. If the New York Times eliminated all contractions in one issue, they would probably loose hundreds of thousands of dollars on advertising revenue for the space they would take up.
     

    sweetpotatoboy

    Senior Member
    English, UK (London)
    I only mean contractions such as isn't and aren't and the likes.
    I would say that the 'quality' newspapers don't use such contractions - except in quotes or in opinion columns, which will vary according to the style of the journalist in question.

    As for the tabloid papers, I suspect that they do.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I would say that the 'quality' newspapers don't use such contractions - except in quotes or in opinion columns, which will vary according to the style of the journalist in question.

    As for the tabloid papers, I suspect that they do.
    I thought that too, until I had a look. I don't see any contractions except in direct speech - even in The Sun and The Mirror.
     

    Christhiane

    Senior Member
    English
    OK, thanks. I've tried looking for it in newspapers earlier, but such things are evilly evasive when you're actually trying to find them.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Headlines may have different standards:

    One in seven wasn’t guilty
    Nov 26th 1998 | CHICAGO
    From The Economist print edition
    One year on
    The wake-up call that wasn't

    Jul 6th 2006 | LEEDS
    From The Economist print edition
    A year ago, Muslims and the government promised to work together against extremism. That hasn't happened
     
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