Contracted forms : there's and there're

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effect3

Senior Member
Polish-Poland
In speech we often use contractions, so is the form there're (there are) correct?

e.g There're a lot of people here.
There're some books on the shelf.
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Both of your sentences are ones where most English speakers would use "there's" rather than "there're".
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Speech does not come with subtitles, so yes, we sometimes elide the "a" in "are" just by the way we talk. If you transcribe speech, then you have the choice of how to represent that. In any case, "there're" is acceptable.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In speech we often use contractions, so is the form there're (there are) correct?

    e.g There're a lot of people here.
    There're some books on the shelf.
    Yes, as long as you are introducing a plural.

    So, in both cases, your examples are correct, and I don't think the singular form would sound right to most educated ears.

    I deplore the use of there's to introduce plural nouns. It's a disgracefully lazy habit.

    The only problem is that there're can sound clumsy, particularly when introducing words starting in r - there're regular readers in our library.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    There're a lot of people here.
    There're some books on the shelf.


    This contraction looks more awkward written down than it sounds in speech. If you are transcribing what someone said, you need not contract this - I would write it down as "There are..." unless I wanted to show that this is very casual speech.

    There are a lot of people here; they're all hoping for a bargain.
     
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