contracted 'has got': the house's got/Mr Smiths's got/Amy Adams's got

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wolfbm1

Senior Member
Polish
Hello.
1. The house's got four bedrooms and a big garden.
2. Mr Smith's got one dog.
3. Amy Adams's got a rabbit and two cats.

In British English, are those contractions used with nouns ending in 's' 'se' or 'th'?
Is the full form 'has' preferred in such cases?

Thank you.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    In British English, are those contractions used with nouns ending in 's' 'se' or 'th'?
    Yes

    Is the full form 'has' preferred in such cases?
    Your examples are accurate representations of spoken English and would only be seen in writing as direct speech. They would not be used in formal written English.
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I wondered because in New Total English Elementary there is an audioscript which prefers "house has got' over 'house's got':
    "The house has got four bedrooms and a big garden. We've got two children and three cats. [...] I haven't got a cat but my husband has, [...] Harry's got three computers."
    So, it isn't a mistake to use the full form "has got" in colloquial English.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I think it may also depend on how long the name is. "John Adams's writings", "Jesus's teachings", but "Aristophanes' plays", "Mephistopheles' persuasion in Faust".
    You may have misread - This is not a question of the genitive "s" which has its own guidance, this is a contraction of "has".
    So, it isn't a mistake to use the full form "has got" in colloquial English.
    No.
     
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