contradistinction

Brigitte_anna

Senior Member
Russian
Hi!

The whole point of the original statement was the contradistinction of a time period that continues up to now and a time period that has ended in the past.

Do natives use the word contradistinction in everyday speach? If not, then what is the right word to use in the stentence above?
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Certainly not in everyday speech. I've seen it in academic books now and again. We'd just say 'distinction (between)'. If the intended meaning is a contrary distinction in opposition to a first distinction . . . well that would hardly ever come up in speech anyway.
     

    Brigitte_anna

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Certainly not in everyday speech. I've seen it in academic books now and again. We'd just say 'distinction (between)'. If the intended meaning is a contrary distinction in opposition to a first distinction . . . well that would hardly ever come up in speech anyway.
    Thanks. And I think the word contrast is good there? Although not so good as contradistinction.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The word is mainly used in the expression 'in contradistinction to', I think, where it more clearly means "contrast". I'm not even sure what the original sentence means: simply a contrast? Or do they want to make a contrast and a distinction?
     

    Brigitte_anna

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The word is mainly used in the expression 'in contradistinction to', I think, where it more clearly means "contrast". I'm not even sure what the original sentence means: simply a contrast? Or do they want to make a contrast and a distinction?
    The original statement:

    The choice of present perfect or past tense depends on the frame of reference (period or point in time) in which the event is conceived as occurring. If the frame of reference extends to the present time, the present perfect is used. If the frame of reference is a time in the past, or a period that ended in the past, the past tense is used instead.

    How would a native say:

    The whole point of the original statement is the [distinction, contrast] of a time period that continues up to now and a time period that has ended in the past.

    In other words:

    The distinction between tenses is based on the [contrasting] a time period that continues up to now and a time period that has ended in the past.



    Or do they want to make a contrast and a distinction?
    Sorry, didn't get what do you mean.
     
    Last edited:

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    The whole point of the original statement is the [distinction, contrast] of a time period that continues up to now and a time period that has ended in the past.
    Your word choice should be based on your target audience. 10-year-olds who just start to learn English as a second language will need a different wording than 25-year-old linguistics students!

    But as a general purpose phrasing, I might say:
    The whole point of the original statement is to differentiate between/make a distinction between a time period that continues up to now and a time period that has ended in the past.
     
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