controversy = fallout

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
It first says "stem continuing controversy", then "continues to battle fallout." Thus it appears "controversy = fallout (the unpleasant results or effects."

Does "stem continuing controversy" share the same meaning with "continues to battle fallout"?

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Archaeological society tries to stem continuing controversy over #MeToo scandal
The Society for American Archaeology (SAA) continues to battle fallout for the way it handled a #MeToo scandal at its annual meeting last week. The organization faced a firestorm of criticism on social media for not immediately ejecting an alleged harasser from the meeting after being informed about his presence and a university investigation that found accusations against him credible.

Source: Science By Lizzie Wade Apr. 18, 2019
https://www.sciencemag.org/news/201...tem-continuing-controversy-over-metoo-scandal
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Thus it appears "controversy = fallout (the unpleasant results or effects."
    I'd say it's the result of the continuing controversy that is the fallout.

    Journalists often try to express a situation in different words, to avoid repeating expressions. In this case both phrases are used with reference to the same matter, though they don't mean exactly the same.

    I don't think you should conclude that one phrase is "equal" to another merely because they've both been used with reference to the same thing. It's the concept, or the idea being conveyed, that is the same, which is that they are still dealing with the problems caused by the controversy.
     
    Last edited:

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I don;t think you should conclude that one phrase is "equal" to another merely because they've both been used with reference to the same thing. It's the concept, or the idea being conveyed, that is the same, which is that they are still dealing with the problems caused by the controversy.
    :thumbsup:

    Controversy generates fallout. Or the circumstances that lead to the controversy generate fallout. Either way, the controversy isn't the fallout.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Thus it appears "controversy = fallout (the unpleasant results or effects."
    No.

    First there is a controversial statement/action
    This causes controversy (the expression of conflicting and irreconcilable views) among the people who have strong opinions about the statement/action.

    The fall-out is the division, polarization, bad feeling, invective, etc., etc., that is the result of the two sides clashing.
     
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