Cook a pig basically

Su117

Member
Ukrainian
"Sometimes they do a hog roast as well, which is where they cook a pig basically and everyone gets given sandwiches with that."

1. Does the expression "cook a pig basically" collocate (is idiomatic)?
2. What is the meaning of "with that". Does it mean "meanwhile"?

It is from
"HOBBIES & PASTIMES
VOCABULARY
CONVERSATION PRACTICE
© ENGLISH WITH LUCY
YOUTUBE. COM/ENGLISH WITH LUCY
CONVERSATION TRANSCRIPT:"
 
  • elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    1. It's not an expression. "basically" is a conversational filler: "where they cook a pig, basically, and..."
    2. I guess she means they make sandwiches out of the roasted pig, so everyone gets roast pork sandwiches. That's not how I would have worded it. To me, "sandwiches with that" suggests "sandwiches along with something else."
    3. "gets given" sounds extremely strange to me. I guess it's okay in British English?
     
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    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    It means that the essential idea is that they cook a pig. It is an idiomatic use of 'basically', when someone wants to give the most important information without going into details.

    In this context, 'with that' means, 'along with a serving of the pig meat'. The sentence is understandable, but it is loosely constructed. It is not a model to be followed.

    Cross-posted.
     

    Wordy McWordface

    Senior Member
    SSBE (Standard Southern British English)
    1. As Elroy says, 'basically' is just a conversation filler. It's the kind of word - like "You know" and "I mean" - which people drop into conversation without much thought. She adds this word to explain that the 'basic idea' of a hog roast is to cook a pig: they cook a pig is essentially what happens when people organise a hog roast. You could see it as a form of discourse marker to reinforce the connection between the term hog roast and its simple definition (they cook a pig), before she moves on to the next part of her explanation.

    2. I agree that the phrase everyone gets given sandwiches with that is poorly constructed. What she means is that the people organising the hog roast make sandwiches with that (where that is the roast pork). In other words, they make sandwiches by putting servings of the roast pork between pieces of bread. Then everyone is given these sandwiches. The wording is misleading, as the preposition with implies that they receive sandwiches alongside a serving of roast pork (as Elroy suggests and as Cagey seems to have understood). In fact, they only get one thing - a roast pork sandwich.

    3. In answer to Elroy's query: Yes, everyone gets given is OK in British English. It's not very elegant, but it is unremarkable in casual speech. It's a slightly more emphatic, informal version of "everyone is given", meaning "everyone receives". It has the same meaning as "everyone gets", but without the ambiguity around whether people get the sandwiches for themselves or whether they're given the sandwiches. [And a query from me: is get+past participle never used in this sense in AmE?]
     
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    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    The wording is misleading, as the preposition with suggests that they receive sandwiches alongside a serving of roast pork (as Elroy suggests and as Cagey seems to have understood).
    In fact, that's how I initially understood it, and I had even written that as my response. But then I thought about it and decided that it wasn't very plausible to just say that they got sandwiches of an unspecified type along with the roast pork. So I arrived at my interpretation based on plausibility, not on the structure of the sentence.

    [And a query from me: is get+past participle never used in this sense in AmE?]
    It is! It was the specific combination "gets given" that sounded odd to me. "Everyone gets served a sandwich" sounds perfectly idiomatic to me. For some reason, I don't think "gets given" is common in American English.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    " A hog roast" sounds somewhat exotic to a British ear, so I think Lucy is explaining that, basically, it involves cooking a pig. But I expect there is more to it than that.

    Champagne is a fizzy white wine, basically.
     
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